June 19, 1944, Battle of the Philippine Sea/Marianas Turkey Shoot: Hellcats from VF-16 sit on deck of the Lexington, ready for launching. (National Archives photo)
June 19 1944 Battle of the Philippine SeaMarianas Turkey Shoot Hellcats from
Jeffery Hampton
Donald Pfaff
Mason Uhlmansiek
Pointe du Hoc, Normandie, 1944

Le sergent Warden F. Lovell (165th Signal Photo Company) examine son appareil photo arraché des mains par une balle allemande lors du débarquement avec les soldats du 2nd Ranger Battalion lors de l'assaut de la batterie allemande.

Sergeant Warden F. Lovell (165th Signal Photo Company) examines his camera snatched from his hands by a German bullet during the...
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America in WWII magazine 06/22/2017
Bea Engle
Here is a link with several period photos of former Miss America Venus Ramey: [ Huffingtonpost.com Link ] Again, our condolences to her family, and our respect for her World War II era work.
Here is a link with several period photos of former Miss America

War Bond-Selling, Gun-Toting Miss America Of 1944 Dies

huffingtonpost.com
Bob Nash
Paul F Harris
Paul Eric Palmer
Thank you for your service to America! Rest in peace, and our condolences to your family.
Thank you for your service to America Rest in peace and our condolences to your family

1944 Miss America Who Inspired WWII Effort Dies at 92

usnews.com
Ruth Thompson
Ruthanne Gordon Clark
Julie Evoritt Gannon
Happy Father's Day to our dads and dad-like folks, thanks for all you do! Here's one dad who was part of the inspiration for this magazine (thank you, Sgt. Bill Kushlan, this photo from very early in his decades of service).
Who inspires your interest in World War II?
Happy Fathers Day to our dads and dadlike folks thanks for all
Reece G Venable
Jeffery Hampton
Rita West Myers
It’s farewell to Europe for these excited GIs making the first stage of their long journey home aboard a French train in Le Havre, France, in May 1945. Among some of the first GIs to accumulate the number of service points required for discharge, many of them have chalked the names of their destinations on the sides of the railroad car. (National Archives)
Its farewell to Europe for these excited GIs making the first stage
Ding de Castro
Don Buxton
Tessie Chua
Flag Day: Old Glory rises above Bitche, France in this March 16, 1945 photo. National Archives.
Flag Day Old Glory rises above Bitche France in this March 16
Nancy Child Dunn
Ryan McLain
Barbara Ann Harvey
Old Glory: Every marine on Iwo Jima cheered when Old Glory rose over Mt. Suribachi on day five of the assault. AP photographer Joe Rosenthal missed the shot. When marines replaced the flag with a larger one, he clicked a fast shot, then took one of marines around the flag as backup. Marine photographer Bob Campbell took THIS picture of Rosenthal snapping the second shot. National Archives...
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Old Glory Every marine on Iwo Jima cheered when Old Glory rose
Jim Bonnette Sr.
Jim Heckenberger
Ben Alexander
Normandy D-Day: GIs of the 1st Infantry Division wait aboard a transport ship for the signal to go. They will end up making a hotly contested landing on Omaha Beach. (National Archives)
Normandy DDay GIs of the 1st Infantry Division wait aboard a transport
Ed Thompson
Robert Jantzen
Normandy D-Day: Word of the D-Day offensive had broad home front support and news spread quickly. Here is the flag at the top of the front page of the Harrisburg, Pennsylvania EVENING NEWS, June 6, 1944.
Normandy DDay Word of the DDay offensive had broad home front support
Normandy D-Day: Within days, supplies, troops, tanks, and weapons were pouring onto the busy beachhead. Here, vehicles stream ashore from landing ships under the protection of barrage balloons. We believe it to be mid-June, Omaha Beach, low tide. LSTs shown seem to be 533, 262, 532, 524, & 310. Either before the deployment of the Mulberry artificial harbor there on June 9th, or after it was...
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Normandy DDay Within days supplies troops tanks and weapons were pouring onto
Lori Pfeifer
Janet Klees Miller Gore
Normandy D-Day: Ever-present danger. These Navy beach battalion men dodge bullets as a German fighter plane strafes the beachhead, days after the Allied landing. (National Archives)
Normandy DDay Everpresent danger These Navy beach battalion men dodge bullets as
Normandy D-Day: With a DUKW in the background (see earlier post), a member of the US Navy’s 2nd Beach Battalion tinkers with a captured German Goliath tracked mine, or “beetle,” on Utah Beach, a day or two after D-Day. The Goliath was a radio-controlled mini-tank that let the user remain under cover while sending explosives into enemy lines, and then detonating them remotely. (National Archives)
Normandy DDay With a DUKW in the background see earlier post a
Jason Smith
Vick Fiore
Jim Smejkal
Normandy D-Day: GIs—one merely hinted at by his boots—sleep in a foxhole on the beachhead, reducing their chance of being hit by shrapnel or picked off by snipers. (Photo courtesy of Robert Gabrick)
Normandy DDay GIsone merely hinted at by his bootssleep in a foxhole
Nancy Lee McAvoy
Jun 06, 1944 - 11:00 [#DDay] Vierville secured by American soldiers. #wwii
America in WWII magazine 06/06/2017
Normandy D-Day: An American clerk records information on a young Mongolian soldier—one of many found among the German troops captured on D-Day. (National Archives)
Normandy DDay An American clerk records information on a young Mongolian soldierone
Максим Максимов
Tom Roberts
Joel Albert
6 June 1944: Americans landed on Omaha and Utah beaches. The men who hit Omaha got the worst of it. Here is the view of an invasion beach from a German 77mm gun inside a gun emplacement—after its capture by Americans. (National Archives)
6 June 1944 Americans landed on Omaha and Utah beaches The men
Normandy D-Day: Captured German troops keep their hands up as GIs escort them to a holding area on the beachhead. (National Archives)
Normandy DDay Captured German troops keep their hands up as GIs escort
David Atkins
Michael Machol
Dale Preisach
Normandy D-Day: Here's a closer crop of that Pointe du Hoc image posted earlier. Army Rangers trained for the climb, but support troops and ladder height were short, and they had to improvise during an active, challenged invasion. (National Archives photo)
Normandy DDay Heres a closer crop of that Pointe du Hoc image
Ron Murphy
Lorna Murray