It's time for Trilobite Tuesday! As superficially similar as some trilobites may appear to certain contemporary creatures-- perhaps most notably, isopods and horseshoe crabs-- in all honesty, any and all such similarities are nothing more than shell deep. Indeed, appearances aside, the fact is that trilobites have no direct living relatives, and while they do share many of the key... View more »
It's time for Trilobite Tuesday As superficially similar as some trilobites may

Timeline Photos

Larry Chandler
Alexis Wilson
Did you know there’s a complex ecosystem comprised of trillions of organisms living inside each and every one us? In 2003, the Human Genome Project announced it had completed sequencing every base pair of DNA from an individual human and mapped all the genes—together known as the genome—of our species, Homo sapiens. Read about how this discovery has led to a revolution in our understanding of... View more »
Did you know there’s a complex ecosystem comprised of trillions of organisms

Meet Your Microbiome

goo.gl
Capuchin monkeys, like the one pictured below, are among the most intelligent and social primates. Their hands are nearly as dexterous as human hands, and they use tools. They can also jump up to 9 feet, an extremely useful adaptation for an arboreal primate.

Female capuchin monkeys are known to be proactive in courtship, and have been observed raising their eyebrows at males, or tapping the... View more »
Capuchin monkeys like the one pictured below are among the most intelligent

Timeline Photos

Karen Brown
Julieta Benitez Malvido
Roberto E. Rodriguez Cancel
It's Ology Live! With Anemone Scientist Adolfo Lara and youth correspondent Katie. Post your questions in the comments below!
It's Ology Live With Anemone Scientist Adolfo Lara and youth correspondent Katie
FACEBOOK.COM
Yvonne Scheren
Stacey James Gordon
Stacey James Gordon
Manta rays have the largest brain of any fish studied. They display keen intelligence and social behavior, including coordinated feeding.
Manta rays have the largest brain of any fish studied They display

gph.is

gph.is
Zoe Ophelia Elsenova
Pep Jewell
Paloma Posada Duque
Fox moths (Macrothylacia rubi), like the regal lepidopteran pictured below, are named for their coloration, and adult males display the reddish brown of their namesake. Before they become moths, they are young, dark brown caterpillars with light orange bands along their bodies. As caterpillars, they hibernate in leaf litter between September and March, and then fly as moths from May to July.... View more »
Fox moths Macrothylacia rubi like the regal lepidopteran pictured below are named

Fox Moth II

flickr.com
Amy Baldwin
Karen Brown
the Otherist
A wombat’s main defense is a tough backside: its rump is mostly cartilage, resistant to bites. A group of wombats is called a wisdom.
A wombat’s main defense is a tough backside: its rump is mostly

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gph.is
Bahb Cruz
Jamie d'Acacia Knott
Cat Hankins
The staff members of the Division of Invertebrate Zoology at the Museum actively study and archive a massive collection of non-vertebrate animals. Amazingly, invertebrates make up 95% of all animal species on Earth. The Division houses more than 24 million specimens, which comprises about 500,000 species. Most of these specimens are terrestrial arthropods---which include insects and... View more »
The staff members of the Division of Invertebrate Zoology at the Museum

Timeline Photos

Bahb Cruz
the Otherist
Bev Lewis
What determines how fast animals can run? Scientists have a new theory.

During a recent study, Myriam Hirt, a zoologist at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research in Leipzig, and her colleagues studied 474 species. This is a novel approach—in the past, researchers have focused on much smaller groups of animals. After mapping the species’ top recorded speeds, Hirt and her... View more »
What determines how fast animals can run Scientists have a new theory

Why midsized animals are the fastest on Earth | Science | AAAS

sciencemag.org
Rick Tweed
JamesJudy Greene
Carmen Rivera
Don’t let looks fool you—these beautiful crustaceans, known as Peacock Mantis Shrimp (Odontodactylus scyllarus), are ferocious undersea predators. The colorful stomatopods hunt with clubbed forelimbs, and can wallop their prey at the speed of a .22 caliber bullet--enough to break aquarium glass.

When they aren’t using their specially adapted striking-appendage, they fold the limb under their... View more »
Don’t let looks fool you—these beautiful crustaceans known as Peacock Mantis Shrimp

images.mentalfloss.com/

images.mentalfloss.com
Chris Italia
Christine Redding
Carolmarie Chimento
It's Ology Live! with shark scientist Allison Bronson and youth correspondent Katie. Post your shark questions in the comments below.
It's Ology Live with shark scientist Allison Bronson and youth correspondent Katie
FACEBOOK.COM
Anh Luu
Neal Schwartz
Wayne Manzur
Later today we're hosting a special Facebook Live interview with shark expert Allison Bronson. Have any questions about sharks you want us to ask her? Submit them below in the comments section!
Later today we're hosting a special Facebook Live interview with shark expert

Timeline Photos

Helga Evelyn
Michele Sanford
Skylar Bliss Guerra
A Museum researcher once called Archaeopteryx the “poster child” for evolution. The first skeleton of the dinosaur was found in Germany around the time that Charles Darwin published his seminal On the Origin of Species in 1859. With both avian and reptilian traits (the animals possessed feathers and long bony tails), Archaeopteryx helped the public understand the possible link between... View more »
A Museum researcher once called Archaeopteryx the “poster child” for evolution The

Timeline Photos

Durward Starman
Mario Rodgers
Richard Karsmakers
This 1927 photo from the Museum's archives features taxidermist Louis Paul Jonas and one of two Asian Elephants that still stand in the Hall of Asian Mammals. Like the Akeley Hall of African Mammals, this hall features a centerpiece grouping of freestanding elephants, encouraging comparisons between the two types. The Asian elephant is generally smaller than the African elephant, and has... View more »
This 1927 photo from the Museum's archives features taxidermist Louis Paul Jonas

Timeline Photos

Paulo Gellio
Rigel Dyess-Hall
Anja Meyer Hoffmann
NBC Nightly News interviewed Museum research associate Saavik Ford for a special Facebook Live segment celebrating Apollo 11's moon landing, and discussing the future of space exploration. Watch below!
NBC Nightly News interviewed Museum research associate Saavik Ford for a special

LIVE: 48 years after man lands on moon

FACEBOOK.COM
Rigel Dyess-Hall
On this day in 1969, with 600 million people watching on TV, an American crew landed on the Moon. The Apollo 11 mission had three crew members: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins. Collins piloted the craft that would return them to Earth, while the others became the first two people ever to walk the Moon’s surface.

Eventually, a total of six Apollo missions would land men on the... View more »
On this day in 1969 with 600 million people watching on TV

Timeline Photos

Terrence Fagan
Raphael Fontenot
Jorge Rodriguez
Channel your inner Ben Stiller and participate in the Night at the Museum adult sleepover on August 11th or October 13th. Sip wine, patrol the darkened halls with a flashlight, listen to live music, and sleep under the giant blue whale. Read more about the event at the link below and purchase tickets before they sell out: [ Goo.gl Link ]
Channel your inner Ben Stiller and participate in the Night at the

Here's What It Looks Like To Sleep Over In The American Museum of Natural History

gothamist.com
Stella Lee
Marissa Lieberman
Liz Meehan
In 2012, the Museum employed a team of artists, taxidermists, conservators, and designers to restore the Hall of North American Mammals' specimens, install new lighting, and attend to the animals’ detailed habitats. As part of the year-long restoration, this handsome looking jack-rabbit received a special make-over.

One of the biggest challenges involved painting the animal’s delicate inner... View more »
In 2012 the Museum employed a team of artists taxidermists conservators and

Timeline Photos

Helga Evelyn
Kathy Dwyer
Ace Comparato
Sorry, Tyrannosaurus rex lovers! Scientists just discovered that the mighty dinosaurs probably weren’t as speedy as Jurassic Park would have you believe. Previously, paleontologists estimated the reptiles could run between 11 and 33 miles per hour, while the world’s fastest human can reach 27 miles per hour. Now, University of Manchester paleontologist William Sellers and his team make the... View more »
Sorry Tyrannosaurus rex lovers Scientists just discovered that the mighty dinosa

Actually, You Could Have Outrun a T. rex

news.nationalgeographic.com
Dan D'Agostino
Brian LeMaresquier
Bryan White
The earliest known dugong fossils were found in 50 million-year-old marine sediments. At that point in geologic time, two different groups of sirenians, or so-called sea cows, had already evolved---dugongs being one of them, and manatees being the other. Interestingly, both species are related to elephants.

Found in warm coastal waters, dugongs can grow up to 10 feet long, weigh up to 1,100... View more »
The earliest known dugong fossils were found in 50 million year old

Timeline Photos

Tina Marie Celella
Dan Toma
Kenny Ramirez