APS Physics
03/24/2017 at 15:56. Facebook
Imagine a series of spins represented as arrows all pointing in the same direction, and you have a magnet. If you bump one arrow, it sets off a wave of motion through the spins called a magnon. Now researchers have shown that magnons can survive at temperatures so hot that the arrows point in random directions, at least on average. But small regions can remain aligned and allow magnons to...
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Focus: Magnetic Fluctuations without a Magnet

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APS Physics
yesterday at 18:36. Facebook
Nominations are now being accepted for APS Fellowship and APS Prizes & Awards. Submit your nominations today!

APS Honors

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APS Physics
yesterday at 15:40. Facebook
The world's fastest supercomputers can perform more operations per second than a human brain, but they burn hundreds of thousands of times the energy. A new scheme using superconductors and LEDs would be more efficient than a brain. LEDs require very little energy, and they could transmit signals that would be detected by superconducting wires.

Synopsis: Mimicking the Brain with Superconductors and LEDs

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APS Physics
yesterday at 14:08. Facebook
On this day in 1882, one of the most significant and obscure 20th century mathematicians was born. Emmy Noether's work provided a fundamental connection between symmetry in nature and the laws of conservation. Happy birthday Emmy Noether!

This Month in Physics History

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APS Physics
03/22/2017 at 16:08. Facebook
The classic traveling salesman problem is to find the shortest path that visits multiple cities chosen in advance. The problem shows up in many forms, such as wiring a building, and the computational power required to solve it grows rapidly with the number of cities or other elements. Researchers knew that a quantum computer could speed up the brute-force-type solutions, and now they show that...
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Synopsis: Traveling with a Quantum Salesman

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APS Physics
03/22/2017 at 14:03. Facebook
The 2017 annual APS Business Meeting was held during the March Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. The meeting featured presentations from APS leadership and provided members with an opportunity to ask questions in-person and online. Check out the video now!

2017 Annual APS Business Meeting

The 2017 annual APS Business Meeting was held during the March Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. The meeting featured presentations from APS leadership and ...

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APS Physics
03/21/2017 at 18:00. Facebook
APS Physics
03/21/2017 at 15:47. Facebook
Arctic sea ice can get trapped in a narrow channel and form an ice bridge across the water. These bridges can help polar bears get around, but they may also have effects on climate, as they block the flow of ice into warmer waters. Now researchers from Princeton University have developed a theory that predicts when ice bridges are likely form.

Synopsis: How Ice Bridges Form

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APS Physics
03/21/2017 at 14:00. Facebook
Thanks to Jean-Baptise Joseph Fourier, we are able to analyze a sound mathematically to determine its component frequencies using the Fourier transform. Happy 249th birthday Jean-Baptiste Joseph Fourier!

This Month in Physics History

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APS Physics
03/20/2017 at 23:00. Facebook
Turbulent flow in the atmosphere or in water, for example, means flow that isn't smooth and often appears chaotic. Researchers have now shown some patterns in turbulence in a two-dimensional flow and used them to accurately predict how the flow evolved, as physicists Björn Hof and Nazmi Burak Budanur of the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria explain.

Viewpoint: Searching for Order in Turbulent Flow

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APS Physics
03/20/2017 at 20:29. Facebook
What happens in New Orleans does NOT stay in New Orleans, because we report on some moments from last week's APS March Meeting. The 10,000 physicists reported on a robot that catches fish, a material with an extreme magnetic response, studies of the extinct dodo's color, why companies need physicists to handle big data, and more.

Meetings: Seen and Heard at the 2017 APS March Meeting

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APS Physics
03/20/2017 at 18:00. Facebook
Where will you be when this year's total solar eclipse dims the lights? In August 2017, a total solar eclipse will pass directly over the continental United States, leaving scientists across the country in an eager scramble to prepare for a quick round of data collection. The maximum 3 minutes of darkness that will cover 12 states during the eclipse is prime opportunity for solar astronomers...
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Solar Eclipse Offers Up a Scientific Bonanza

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APS Physics
03/20/2017 at 14:00. Facebook
As part of a dispute with Italian physician and anatomist Luigi Galvani, Alessandro Volta set out to disprove Galvani's "animal electricity" theory. To show that the generation of an electric current didn't require any animal parts, Volta put together a messy stack of zinc & silver discs, separated by brine-soaked cloth. In a letter dated March 20, 1800, Volta first reported the steady current...
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This Month in Physics History: March 20, 1800: Volta describes the electric battery

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APS Physics
03/19/2017 at 18:00. Facebook
This month in Physics History: Alexander von Humboldt discovers the perfect way to fish for electric eels. In 1800 during a Venezuelan expedition, von Humboldt was on the hunt for these exotic aquatic creatures. Come to find that these eels were startled by the horses wading in shallow waters, he noticed they would give the horses a high-voltage shock to scare them away. After a series of...
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This Month in Physics History

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APS Physics
03/17/2017 at 18:00. Facebook
Explaining physics to your neighbor might be a strange task, but according to Ivan Schuller, director of the Center for Advanced Nanoscience at the University of California San Diego, explaining science to the general public is important as ever. Learn about how he tackles communicating to the masses on the Back Page of APS News:

The Back Page

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APS Physics
03/17/2017 at 15:56. Facebook
Some areas of the asteroid Itokawa are covered with seas of pebbles and dust, while others are strewn with boulders. Why aren't the two better mixed? Rutgers University researchers performed computer simulations and experiments, such as dropping small beads on rocks, and found that it all depends on what small rocks do when they hit the surface. They tend to bounce off of boulders but stay in...
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Focus: Hard and Soft Bounces Explain Asteroid’s Surface Structure

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APS Physics
03/17/2017 at 02:13. Facebook
Quantum dots are tiny semiconductor islands useful for devices such as single-photon sources. Locating them can be hard, since they are often created at random locations within a microstructure. A new technique creates images that locate the dots based on the changes in their luminescence produced by vibrations.

Synopsis: Straining After Quantum Dots

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Ever since he was young, Dr. Robert H. Goddard had dreams of sending a rocket to Mars. As early as 1909, Goddard considered the idea of a liquid fuel rocket that would utilize hydrogen and oxygen. After 17 years of theoretical and experimental work, he was able to finally achieve flight of a liquid fueled rocket on this day in 1926.

This Month in Physics History

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The world became clearer in 1938 thanks to Katharine Blodgett. After returning to the US from receiving her PhD from Cambridge University, she rejoined the staff at GE as a research scientist. She began collaborating with Irving Langmuir to improve lightbulbs, then in 1933 they began working again on surface films. Blodgett developed a way to transfer the soap film from a water surface to a...
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This Month in Physics History

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From the first light source in the Middle East, to the search for the next African Einstein, and the ultimate quest for dark matter, the world is bustling with physics initiatives that are driving the power of international collaboration. Learn more about these projects and where they are headed in this edition of APS News:

International Firsts in Physics

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