Feeling the cold lately? Just be glad you're not a spider.
Feeling the cold lately Just be glad you're not a spider

Where have all the spiders gone?

australianmuseum.net.au
Leo Skowronek
Peter Robert Green
Bev Fox
Australian Museum
Australian Museum
yesterday at 06:30. Facebook
This iron meteorite in our collection is part of the 'Mundrabilla' fall of meteorites on the Nullarbor Plain of WA. This piece alone weighs 617kg, with the total mass of the fall estimated at 24 tonnes!
This iron meteorite in our collection is part of the Mundrabilla fall

Meteors and Meteorites

australianmuseum.net.au
Ian Arthur Ison
Ian Arthur Ison
Australian Museum
Australian Museum
05/27/2017 at 22:00. Facebook
A Male Common Seadragon (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus) with eggs attached to the underside of its tail, snapped by Erik Schlogl. Have you taken a photo of a seadragon, or know someone who has? Click through to share in the name of (citizen) science!
A Male Common Seadragon Phyllopteryx taeniolatus with eggs attached to the underside

Seadragon Shots sought for Science

inaturalist.org
Nicky Pearson
Maria Helena Goodenough
Cordula Pelarek
Australian Museum
Australian Museum
05/26/2017 at 22:00. Facebook
You just got #bluetongued. Our herpetology whiz Stephen holds a Centralian blue-tongued skink (Tiliqua multifasciata) while on a Bush Blitz of the Northern Territory last week. Stephen and our Frog Guru Jodi Rowley were there surveying frogs and reptiles in a really remote and biologically unexplored part of the Northern Territory. Learn more about the Bush Blitz at: bushblitz.org.au. Video...
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Dominique Wain
Robert Higgins
Australian Museum
Australian Museum
05/26/2017 at 06:26. Facebook
"In 1889 AM Curator Robert Etheridge wrote, ‘Soon to become extinct on Lord Howe, unless protected, is the Wood-Hen…a curious and stupid bird…Its gradual extinction is probably due to the ravages committed by the wild domestic cats.’

Heeding this early warning, by 1966 Woodhens were classified as endangered, and today their numbers are still closely monitored."
In 1889 AM Curator Robert Etheridge wrote Soon to become extinct on

Where it all began

australianmuseum.net.au
Australian Museum
Australian Museum
05/25/2017 at 06:04. Facebook
Join Aboriginal Community members to weave together knowledge, experience and stories through the shared creation of a yarning stick.
Join Aboriginal Community members to weave together knowledge experience and sto

Reconciliation Week at the AM

australianmuseum.net.au
Australian Museum
Australian Museum
05/24/2017 at 06:34. Facebook
It’s not a bird and it’s not a fly, it’s a Bird of Paradise Fly. Despite the name, this insect is actually a type of mealybug. This one was discovered and snapped by Lisa Scott in Leura, NSW and sent in to our Search and Discover experts for identification.
Its not a bird and its not a fly its a Bird

Bird-of-Paradise Flies

australianmuseum.net.au
Les Cormack
Ellison Luk
Sammie Barron
Australian Museum
Australian Museum
05/23/2017 at 06:00. Facebook
Happy World Turtle Day! We thought we'd shellebrate with this breathtaking shot of an Australian Flatback Turtle (Natator depressus), snapped by Matt Curnock — Runner Up in the 2016 Australian Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year ‘Animal Portrait’ category.

A lot about this endemic species remains a mystery. This blue-eyed baby turtle was reared and released with a group of...
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Happy World Turtle Day We thought wed shellebrate with this breathtaking shot
Elizabeth Oliver
Marcella Sewell
Ellison Luk
Give it up for this origami master. The ladybird unfolds its long, hind wings in just a tenth of a second, and neatly folds them back with ease. How it's able to cram these rigid structures into such a tiny space is a valuable lesson for engineers designing deployable structures like umbrellas and satellites.

Article via The New York Times --> [ Nyti.ms Link ]
Give it up for this origami master The ladybird unfolds its long
Shane Lear
Anna Ayvazyan
Tiggy Grillo
Now that our scientists and researchers have returned from Lord Howe Island, what's next? ‘Lots’ is the answer!
Now that our scientists and researchers have returned from Lord Howe Island

Lord Howe Island Expedition

australianmuseum.net.au
A giant, flightless bird with a skull the size of a horse's. As tall as an ostrich, but far more massive. And one *enormous* bill. Meet Dromornis planei — the 'Demon Duck of Doom'.
A giant flightless bird with a skull the size of a horses

Meet the Demon Duck of Doom

australianmuseum.net.au
Krystal Li
Chris Mijota
National Dinosaur Museum
Much-loved Curator Edward Pierson Ramsay significantly enlarged our ethnology collection, and was fascinated in all branches of zoology. But his true <3 was ornithology — the study of birds.
Muchloved Curator Edward Pierson Ramsay significantly enlarged our ethnology col

Australian born and bred

australianmuseum.net.au
Happy International Museum Day! We’re celebrating by sharing some of the memories you’ve been sending in for our 190th anniversary. Keep ‘em coming! Submit your photos via like link below for your chance to win a behind-the-scenes tour of the AM vaults. ---> australianmuseum.net.au/am-memory #IMD #IMD2017
Whoahhh. Look closely at the silver plates on this mirror spider. The eye-catching arthropod is able to shrink and expand its bright reflective panels - a form of camouflage known as rapid colour change. In some instances the gaps between the silver plates almost completely disappear, creating one large reflective surface! Article via Colossal -- [ Thisiscolossal.com Link ]

Get closer to over...
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Whoahhh Look closely at the silver plates on this mirror spider The
Eric Davies
Pat O'Shane
Reid Withnell
A performed reading about the lives and work of Harriet and Helena Scott, followed by a Night Talk investigating the Scott Sisters, art and place.

Join us for another illuminating evening inspired by the work of Harriet and Helena Scott.

First, watch acclaimed actresses Megan Drury and Lauren Richardson bring Harriet and Helena Scott to life in the short, performed reading Through Their...
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A performed reading about the lives and work of Harriet and Helena

The Scott Sisters and the Art of Ash Island

EVENT - facebook.com
It might seem otherwise, but according to our spider experts the male Golden Huntsman (on the right) looks 'a bit nervous' in his attempts to court a female (left) in our Spiders - Alive and Deadly exhibition. Once underway, mating can last anywhere from half an hour to several hours.

See live spiders, watch venom milking and learn more about these fascinating (and often misunderstood)...
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Agnieszka Skibicka
Steven Kaminellis
Chris Gomez
Happy Mother's Day to all the mums out there! Wishing you a trunk load of cuddles.
Happy Mother's Day to all the mums out there Wishing you a trunk load of cuddles

Animal Mothers and Babies

nationalgeographic.com
Perhaps the best-known 'sleepers' are the parrotfishes, who find a suitable spot on the seafloor and secrete a mucus envelope in which they spend the night. Cosy!
Perhaps the bestknown sleepers are the parrotfishes who find a suitable spot

Do Fishes Sleep?

australianmuseum.net.au
Net-casting Spiders have a unique way of catching their prey, making a small web in the form of a net held by the front legs, that can be stretched out wide to envelop an unwary insect passing by. Photo by Abram Powell © Australian Museum.
Netcasting Spiders have a unique way of catching their prey making a

Spiders - Alive & Deadly

australianmuseum.net.au
Australian Museum
Jacqueline Marks
Terry Tung-Yep
This is a 'tropical species', so what on earth is it doing in the cooler waters of Sydney?

Citizen science project Australasian Fishes, headed up by AM's Ichthyologist Mark McGrouther, is making some important (and surprising) observations.
This is a 'tropical species' so what on earth is it doing in the cooler waters of Sydney

Cowtail Ray goes astray

inaturalist.org
Ellison Luk