British Museum
British Museum
06/23/2017 at 17:45. Facebook
‘I realised that I had to make some work to bear witness to the loss of life and turn the spotlight back to the human beings behind the statistics.’

Artist Bern O'Donoghue’s work ‘Dead Reckoning’ uses data collected by the International Organisation for Migration to examine myths about people who are either displaced, or on the move. Read more about the moving story behind her work in this...
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I realised that I had to make some work to bear witness

Dead Reckoning: an installation for Refugee Week

blog.britishmuseum.org
British Museum
British Museum
06/23/2017 at 15:40. Facebook
This incredible frontispiece is drawn in gold, and shows a paradise scene over two pages. It is part of the Buddist illuminated manuscript Amitābha Sūtra, made in Korea in 1341. It shows the historical Buddha, Shakyamuni, flanked by bodhisattvas and monks preaching to deities and other Buddhas. During the Goryeo dynasty in Korea (AD 918–1392), the copying of Buddhist sutras was considered to...
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This incredible frontispiece is drawn in gold and shows a paradise scene
Věruška Dvořáková
Hasmukh Patel
Susan Kruger
British Museum
British Museum
06/23/2017 at 10:11. Facebook
This is the Flood Tablet, so called because this fragment is very similar to the story of Noah’s Ark. The tablet was made around 2,600 years ago, and discovered in the north of what is now modern Iraq. It’s written in cuneiform script – one of the earliest forms of writing, composed of wedge-shaped marks. An assistant at the Museum, George Smith, first translated the tablet in 1872. On...
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Barbara Franzot
Amaris Lee
Zane Martin
British Museum
British Museum
yesterday at 16:06. Facebook
You can listen to stories from the Museum wherever you are with our #podcasts – discover everything from security guard cats to million-year-old footprints.
You can listen to stories from the Museum wherever you are with

British Museum podcasts

blog.britishmuseum.org
Paula Childress Sullivan
Eman Abdel Hamid
Bumpkin Griffin
British Museum
British Museum
yesterday at 10:15. Facebook
How do we help visitors make sense of the Museum and collection? Find out about the art of interpretation in this blog post, including how our Sutton Hoo gallery was redesigned to help visitors engage with key objects.
How do we help visitors make sense of the Museum and collection

A question of interpretation

blog.britishmuseum.org
Paul Musgrave
Hannah Hill
Christopher Rea
British Museum
British Museum
06/21/2017 at 16:41. Facebook
This drum is one of the earliest surviving African-American objects. It was made by the Akan people of Ghana in West Africa and constructed from wood, vegetable fibre and deer skin. It would have been played at religious ceremonies or social occasions as part of an ensemble, and hit with an open hand. It was probably brought to America on a slave ship in the early 18th century, arriving in...
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Claire Petuck
Carlajean Smith
Maria Amelia Sanchez
British Museum
British Museum
06/21/2017 at 10:41. Facebook
Harps like this highly decorated example were played at ancient Egyptian banquets – they’re often shown in scenes covering the walls of tombs. This one was found in a tomb and is over 3,000 years old. Strings were plucked two at a time, and depictions of harps show they could be accompanied by singers and instruments that resemble lutes and oboes. Songs at banquets were usually dedicated to...
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Harps like this highly decorated example were played at ancient Egyptian banquets
Maarten Derijck
Paula Childress Sullivan
Barbara Franzot
British Museum
British Museum
06/20/2017 at 16:27. Facebook
This is a stone version of a belt that was worn by players of the Mesoamerican ballgame – a 3,500-year-old sport that resembled volleyball without a net. Players had to keep a large rubber ball off the ground, and wore padded leather belts to protect their hips from the heavy ball. It’s thought this stone belt may have been worn for ceremonies, or used as a mould for shaping the leather belts....
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Walker Black Johnny
Marcos Cortez
Jezi Chesnu
British Museum
British Museum
06/20/2017 at 09:35. Facebook
In ancient Greece there was a female-only athletic competition at Olympia called the Heraean Games. The event was dedicated to Hera, the goddess for women, and the only event was a 160-metre running race. Women were not allowed to compete in the ancient Greek Olympics, and the Heraean Games were held at a different time of year. This bronze statue corresponds well with descriptions of Spartan...
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In ancient Greece there was a femaleonly athletic competition at Olympia called
Kathleen Miles
Arleda Martinez
Cail Richards
British Museum
British Museum
06/19/2017 at 15:54. Facebook
Over 4,000 years old, this bird-shaped pestle was discovered in Papua New Guinea in the Pacific. Food cultivation developed here over 10,000 years ago as people started to move away from hunter-gatherer lifestyles. Growing crops meant new types of food, and new ways to prepare and store it. The long neck of this pestle meant it may have been too delicate to be used regularly – its bird shape...
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Linda Balas Schmalz
Walker Black Johnny
Thomas Dreiling
British Museum
British Museum
06/19/2017 at 09:43. Facebook
Chef Giorgio Locatelli recreates Pompeiian bread, using a 2,000-year-old loaf as inspiration. You can try Giorgio’s recipe for yourself – full details here: [ Ow.ly Link ]

All through #MuseumWeek we’ll be sharing interesting stories and objects from the collection that relate to each day’s theme. Today’s theme is food!
Farrell Monaco
Alys Nawawi
Parker Myles
British Museum
British Museum
06/18/2017 at 10:15. Facebook
The Battle of Waterloo took place #onthisday in 1815. An especially bloody engagement on a small battlefield in modern-day Belgium, the aftermath of the battle is depicted in this print by Matthew Dubourg. It resulted in a huge defeat for French emperor Napoleon and ushered in a period of relative peace in Europe. [ Ow.ly Link ]
The Battle of Waterloo took place onthisday in 1815 An especially bloody
David Ross
Eoin Casserly
Bobby Presley
British Museum
British Museum
06/18/2017 at 08:54. Facebook
Hokusai’s daughter Katsushika Ōi was an accomplished artist in her own right and worked as Hokusai's collaborator during the final two decades of his life. Discover more about their remarkable relationship this #FathersDay in a new blog post by History of Art Professor Julie Nelson Davis.
Hokusais daughter Katsushika Ōi was an accomplished artist in her own right

Hokusai and Ōi: art runs in the family

blog.britishmuseum.org
Marie-Hélène Antoine Devaux
Barbara Price
Sandra Elizabeth Tutton
British Museum
British Museum
06/17/2017 at 16:50. Facebook
This 17th-century night clock is an exceptionally rare example with a ‘wandering hour’ illuminated dial. In this blog Curator of Horology Oli Cooke details the detective work that goes into finding out more about the clocks and watches in the collection.
This 17thcentury night clock is an exceptionally rare example with a wandering

Time to shine: a 17th-century night clock

blog.britishmuseum.org
Steven Piontkowski
Tricia Kessie
Nagamani Rao
British Museum
British Museum
06/17/2017 at 09:00. Facebook
In the 19th and early 20th centuries, many Palestinian brides wore special ceremonial headdresses during their wedding ceremonies. This example from Samuʿa, a village in the region of the Hebron Hills of southern Palestine, is a beautiful headdress encrusted with coins called a 'wuqāyat al-darāhim' (literally, ‘money hat’). It has densely packed rows of coins, beads, charms and pendants, which...
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In the 19th and early 20th centuries many Palestinian brides wore special
Susan Tomkins
Janna Nayeem
Colin R Macdonald
British Museum
British Museum
06/16/2017 at 11:41. Facebook
Nearly 4,000 years old, this ancient Egyptian pendant is in the form of a winged scarab beetle. The central ornament creates the throne name (Kha-kheper-Ra) of the pharaoh Senwosret II, who reigned 1897–1878 BC. The word ‘kha’ is represented by the hill at the bottom, the sign ‘kheper’ is shown by a scarab, and Ra is depicted at the top by a sun disc between the two front legs. The pendant is...
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Nearly 4000 years old this ancient Egyptian pendant is in the form
Marion Wilmann
Mahmoud Abu Lebda
Sue Davenport
Throughout Africa, textiles communicate the history, beliefs, fashions and aspirations of people using colours, patterns and inscriptions. From kangas worn in eastern Africa to demonstrate a woman’s stance on global issues, to textiles in southern Africa worn during important rites of passage, discover these important cultural statements in this online Google Arts & Culture exhibit...
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Throughout Africa textiles communicate the history beliefs fashions and aspirati
Kellie Daniels
Magdalena Pepa
Francesca Gennari
We’re used to seeing sculptures in white marble or bronze, but the ancient world was in fact full of colour – from ancient Egypt to classical Greece and Rome. In this article, British Museum Scientist Joanne Dyer talks about how conservation, analysis and reconstruction can help paint a picture of the polychrome past.
Were used to seeing sculptures in white marble or bronze but the

Raiders of the lost pigments

chemistryworld.com
Nancy Ewart
Patrick Mizelle
Kathleen Miles
Magna Carta or the ‘Great Charter’ was agreed to by King John #onthisday in 1215. It was written to ease tensions between the unpopular king and the barons whose privileges had slowly been eroded. The charter meant, among other things, the king was now subject to laws, and the barons’ rights were protected. It’s written in Latin, the official ‘language of record’ that was only understood by...
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Magna Carta or the Great Charter was agreed to by King John
Stephen Lines
Frank Malone
Steve Trumbore
Japanese artist #Hokusai produced a series of 15 drawing manuals aimed at students that was known as ‘Hokusai manga’ or ‘Hokusai’s Sketches’. The books are very different from the manga we know today. Hokusai’s manga are spontaneous sketches completed in his own personal style, rather than the storytelling comics the word has become associated with. These two pages are examples from different...
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Japanese artist Hokusai produced a series of 15 drawing manuals aimed at
Dave Douglas
Akira Sato
Jim Cleary