Cambridge English
03/24/2017 at 14:55. Facebook
Happy #WorldPoetryDay!

Here's a little verse we put together for our wonderful learners all around the world.

Do you have a favourite poem?

Perhaps you would like to write another verse for our poem?
Cambridge English
03/23/2017 at 14:50. Facebook
Improve your English with our new app!

Compete against friends and other learners around the world.

Download for free now! #QuizYourEnglish

Cambridge English
03/23/2017 at 10:13. Facebook
We often take them for granted or even forget about them altogether! Here are fourthings to keep in mind when using capital letters. How many do you know?
Cambridge English
03/22/2017 at 15:39. Facebook
The answer to yesterday's grammar mistake.

When 'lot' is in the singular, a determiner always comes before it.
Don’t write ‘lot of something’, write 'a lot of' or 'lots of' something.
Cambridge English
03/22/2017 at 09:12. Facebook
We've come up with our very own emoji to describe English Language Learners! Like it? Please share it, we want to make it as recognisable as possible!
Cambridge English
03/21/2017 at 15:39. Facebook
Improve your writing and learn from your mistakes with Write & Improve:

Can you find the common mistake in this sentence?
Cambridge English
03/21/2017 at 10:31. Facebook
When you're 'snowed under', it doesn't mean you are actually buried in snow! It's an idiom that is used to describe being really busy and to have too much work to do.

What do you do when you're feeling snowed under?
Cambridge English
03/20/2017 at 11:11. Facebook
Do you know anything about Earth Hour?
Don't get stressed in your Cambridge English Writing exam – take a look at this short video for some tips to make sure your writing is perfect!

Share this tip with your friends!
Be clever when you're recording vocabulary – write down different chunks of language that go with a particular word. Here are a few phrases that go with the word 'join'. Can you think of any more? Leave a comment with your ideas!
Did you know that Penélope Cruz wasn't fluent in English when she first went to work in the USA?

It's never too late to learn English – and maybe it will take you as far as it has taken Penélope!
In English we can often use prefixes to change the meaning of a word. For example, 'intelligent' becomes 'unintelligent'. We can also use suffixes to change the form of a word – so 'polite' and the suffix '-ness' becomes 'politeness'.

One word in English that can take a lot of different prefixes and suffixes is 'grace'. See how many you can spot here and do you know any more?
Did you know 'Because' is one of the top 50 words most often spelled incorrectly by learners? Remember, don't write 'ou', write 'au'!

In English we can often use prefixes to change the meaning of a word. For example, 'intelligent' becomes 'unintelligent'. We can also use suffixes to change the form of a word – so 'polite' and the suffix '-ness' becomes 'politeness'.

One word in English that can take a lot of different prefixes and suffixes is 'grace'. See how many you can spot here and do you know any more?
Get to grips with grammar with some handy timelines. You probably know that we use the present simple for general descriptions – 'The sky is blue' – but did you know it's also used for repeated actions and sometimes it can even have a future meaning?

Tag a friend who you think would like these timelines!
Hint: remember that 'a lot' is always written as two words. Don’t write ‘alot’, write 'a lot'.
‘Last Saturday was my birthday and ___ I spent the day doing my favourite things.’

a. but
b. then
c. after
d. before
e. so

Choose the best option. You can find the full exercise and answers on our free Learning English site.

[ Cambridgeenglish.org Link ]
Do you like football? Do you enjoy learning English? Then you'll LOVE our free Cambridge English FC app! It even lets you choose your football kit!

Happy International Women's Day! Here is a selection of words used to talk about women in our families and communities.

Tag a woman in your life that you think would love this!
#IWD2017
This a great quote from Nelson Mandela. He was speaking about his experience of learning Afrikaans, but we think it works really well for learning any language!