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QUIZ ANSWER. Size and shape of this bird is pretty unique. These birds have long bodies that sit lower in the water than other waterbirds. These birds also have long, daggerlike bills and their legs are set further back on their bodies to help propel them underwater. This bird is a member of the loon family. In North America, we have 5 species of loon. The trick to telling these species apart...
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Educators: tonight, Birdsleuth hosts a free webinar exploring evolution, including the concepts of natural and sexual selection, using the latest Bird Academy interactives that help you teach evolution in exciting ways. Join us tonight at 6:00pm ET or Thursday, December 8th at 8:00pm ET. Register by clicking on the link below.

Welcome! You are invited to join a webinar: Exploring Evolution.

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BIRD QUIZ. This week we have a bird that spends its winters on our lakes and shores. Leave your answer in the comments box and we’ll post ours at the end of the day. Thanks to Spencer Jablonski who photographed this bird in Port Washington, Wisconsin, for sharing his photo via the new eBird/Macaulay Library archive.
Please join us at 7:30 Eastern time this evening for a live seminar with Dr. Pete Marra of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center. Dr. Marra will discuss the effect of outdoor cats on numbers of birds in North America, and address possible ways forward. There will be a live Q&A after the talk via online chat. See you there! Click here to view the talk starting at 7:30 Eastern: bit.ly/BirdTalks

Dr. Pete Marra Discusses Outdoor Cats - Live-Streamed Seminar

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A selection of some of the great photos submitted by our Facebook fans in the last week. Thanks and keep those photos coming!
Join us tomorrow evening for a live-streamed seminar by Dr. Pete Marra of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center. Dr. Marra will address the issue of outdoor cats: how we came to have so many of them, the tremendous toll they take on birds and other wildlife, and prospects for solving this contentious problem in a way that is good for both birds and cats. We'll have a live Q&A with Dr. Marra...
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Live-Streamed Seminar: Dr. Pete Marra Discusses Outdoor Cats

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Which is a better way to protect tropical forest: put up a national park or give local people the right to sustainably harvest the forest in exchange for protecting it? In Guatemala's Maya Biosphere Reserve, locally managed forests have seen far less deforestation than adjacent national parks that suffer from low funding. It's an important finding for a place that harbors more than 300 bird...
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People Power and Sustainable Forestry Keep Deforestation at Bay in Guatemala

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Our latest Bird of the Week is easily mistaken for a female of its more common cousin, the Mallard. But look closely and you'll notice richer chocolate-brown flanks, an olive-yellow bill, and a flash of iridescent purple on its wings. Males and females look similar. These birds are found in eastern North America, and form strong pair bonds at this time of year before heading back to breeding...
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American Black Duck - All About Birds

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It's the time of year when Snow Geese form into ginormous flocks and descend on fields and wetlands across parts of the Lower 48. Check out this photo essay and audio slideshow by the Cornell Lab's Gerrit Vyn, chronicling a massive flock at a wildlife refuge near our headquarters in upstate New York. What's the most Snow Geese you've ever seen at one time?

Through the Lens: Snow Goose Migration

Snow Goose migration is spectacular! Cornell Lab of Ornithology photographer Gerrit Vyn takes us to New York's Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge to experien...

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Join us this coming Monday for a live-streamed seminar by Dr. Pete Marra of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center. Dr. Marra will address the issue of outdoor cats: how we came to have so many of them, the tremendous toll they take on birds and other wildlife, and prospects for solving this contentious problem in a way that is good for both birds and cats. We'll have a live Q&A with Dr. Marra...
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Live-Streamed Seminar: Dr. Pete Marra Discusses Outdoor Cats

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Many people contact us about House Finch and other birds with eye problems. Our Question of the Week asks: what's wrong with these birds? In most cases they have something called House Finch eye disease. It was first observed over 20 years ago and has since spread across North America. Find out more and learn what you can do about it:

I've seen a sick House Finch with red, swollen, or weepy eyes. What's wrong with it?

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With Project FeederWatch off to a great start, we always get questions about how to keep squirrels away from feeders. We came up with 9 ideas. Do you have any to share? Please comment below, we'd love to hear from you.

Top 9 Squirrel Intervention Suggestions

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QUIZ ANSWER. The pointy and conical-shaped bill on this bird tells us that it is in the finch family. Although the belly is partly obscured, there is no streaking on the belly which rules out streaky finches such as the Pine Siskin and House Finch. So, it must be a different kind of finch. We have three different species of goldfinch in North America. To separate these goldfinches, we need to...
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Help a migrating bird make it home again! Giving Tuesday is a great day to support your favorite charities, and today your gift to the Cornell Lab counts twice as much thanks to a generous donor who will match your donation dollar for dollar. Please donate today and be part of our mission to advance the understanding of nature and to engage people of all ages in learning about birds and...
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Donate to help birds on Giving Tuesday

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BIRD QUIZ. This week we have bird that frequents bird feeders all across the United States. Leave your answer in the comments box and we’ll post ours at the end of the day. Special thanks to David Hollie from Catoosa, Georgia, for sharing his photo via the eBird/Macaulay Library archive.
A selection of some of the great photos submitted by our Facebook fans in the last week. Thanks and keep those photos coming!
Over the last few years the U.S.'s weather radar system has been upgraded—and in addition to better forecasts, the new technology lets bird researchers not just see where birds are, but figure out which direction they're headed in. This new level of detail is revealing how birds cope with adverse winds on their nightly migrations. Full story here:

Birds Tack Into the Wind on Fall Migration, Weather Radar Reveals

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Our latest Bird of the Week is found throughout North America and has been a staple of American culture for centuries. These large, spectacular birds are usually found walking in groups through the woods, but roost in trees at night. When courting, males puff themselves up, fluffing out their gorgeous iridescent body feathers, fanning their splendid tails, dropping their impressive wings, and...
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Wild Turkey - All About Birds

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Looking for a movie this holiday weekend? Check out "Seasons," a new film from the director of Winged Migration. Experience nature first hand from the ice age to present day, seen through the eyes of the animals. Nature lovers will enjoy spectacular views of wildlife through the changing seasons and years. Enjoy the trailer and find a theater near you: [ Bit.ly Link ]

Seasons - Official Theatrical Trailer

In theaters November 18, 2016! http://www.musicboxfilms.com/seasons After traveling the world alongside migrating birds and diving the oceans with whales and...

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Happy Thanksgiving! We are so thankful for all of you, our supporters. As we gather together for our Thanksgiving feasts, tables across the country usually have one thing in common: the Thanksgiving turkey. Ever wonder where it came from or why it became a popular gastronomic centerpiece? Find out here:

Where did the domestic turkey come from?

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