On this day in 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground, spilling some 11 million gallons (41 million litres) of oil into Prince William Sound in Alaska and creating the largest oil spill in U.S. history. Federal funding played a large part in paying for the damage caused by the spill.

In 1990 the U.S. Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act in direct response to the Exxon Valdez accident....
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Exxon Valdez oil spill

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Otters are known for being tool-using mammals, but that skill may stretch farther back in otters' evolutionary history than previously thought.

Sea Otters’ Tool Use May Date Back Thousands or Even Millions of Years

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How are the names for hurricanes and typhoons picked? #factsmatter #worldmeteorologicalday

How Are Hurricanes and Typhoons Named?

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On this day in 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly referred to as the ACA and Obamacare, into law. The ACA is widely considered the most far-reaching health care reform act since the passage of Medicare in 1965. According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the legislation would extend coverage to some 32 million additional...
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Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) | United States [2010]

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Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have developed a groundbreaking way to remove oil from water - called the Oleo Sponge.
There's a newly proposed definition of "planet" which may change the classification of Pluto yet again.

Was Pluto Just Vindicated?

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On this day in 1972 the U.S. Senate approved the Equal Rights Amendment—which stated, “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex”—but in the ensuing years it failed to be ratified by the requisite majority of 38 states. It remains unratified.

#WomensHistoryMonth
#EqualRightsMatter
#feminism
#WomensRights

Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) | proposed United States legislation

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Do You Know: Phillis Wheatley is largely considered to be the first great black woman poet in US history. Wheatley’s first poem to appear in print was “On Messrs. Hussey and Coffin” (1767), but she did not become widely known until the publication of “An Elegiac Poem, on the Death of the Celebrated Divine…George Whitefield” (1770), a tribute to Whitefield, a popular preacher with whom she may...
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Phillis Wheatley | American poet

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On this day in 1960 black African demonstrators gathered in Sharpeville, South Africa, to protest the country's pass laws when they were fired on by police. 70 people were killed in what was one of the first open protests against apartheid; the incident later became known as the Sharpeville massacre.

#historymatters
#racism
#facts

Sharpeville massacre | South African history [1960]

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The U.S. federal prison on San Francisco Bay's Alcatraz Island, which had held some of the most dangerous civilian prisoners—including Al Capone and Robert Stroud, the “Birdman of Alcatraz”—was closed this day in 1963.

Alcatraz Island | Facts & History

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These 5 poets were known for their work examining what it meant to live in exile. #WorldPoetryDay

5 Poets of Exile

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An organism is any living thing that is capable of growth and reproduction, responds to stimuli, and functions as a system to carry out life processes. What's the smallest?
#OnThisDay in 1965 American civil rights activists led by Martin Luther King, Jr., began a protest march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

#historymatters
#civilrightsmatter
#factsmatter

Selma March | United States history

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The HeLa cells, which have contributed to many scientific advances, including treatments for leukemia, polio, and Parkinson disease, came from an American woman named Henrietta Lacks. Henrietta died of cancer at the age of 31, and was unaware a sample of her cells had been taken for research without her consent. As a result, while the HeLa cells were ubiquitous in medical research, Henrietta's...
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Henrietta Lacks | American medical patient

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Do You Know: On the day of the vernal equinox, Parsis throughout the world celebrate Noruz (Navruz), the traditional solar New Year's Day.

Noruz | Zoroastrianism and Parsiism

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Top leaders of AUM Shinrikyo (Japanese: “AUM Supreme Truth”), a Japanese Buddhist sect founded in 1987 by Asahara Shoko, released nerve gas into a Tokyo subway this day in 1995, killing 12 people and injuring thousands.

Aleph | History & Facts

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It's the vernal equinox, which means it's the first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. The vernal equinox occurs twice every year, when the Sun is exactly above the Equator and both day and night are equally long. The vernal equinox occurs again on September 22 or 23, which will mark the beginning of spring in the Southern Hemisphere.

vernal equinox | astronomy

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The first International Women's Day was observed #onthisday in 1911 by Austria, Denmark, Germany, and Switzerland, with over 1 million people in attendance. #WomensHistoryMonth

International Women's Day (IWD) | holiday

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#OnThisDay in 2003, U.S. President George W. Bush ordered air strikes against Baghdad, the capital of Iraq, thus launching the Iraq War to oust dictator Saddam Hussein. #historymatters

Iraq War | 2003-2011

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Three classic pieces from the iconic board game Monopoly will be discontinued.

The Monopoly Boot Gets the Boot

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