Guardian Science
Guardian Science
05/24/2017 at 15:30. Facebook
"Riders in a peloton can reduce drag, and so save energy, by riding in the wake of a leading rider, slipstreaming them. Energy efficiency is so improved that it allows weaker riders to keep up with riders that they could not otherwise match for speed. In the modern marine environment, versions of this behaviour and their corresponding energy savings have been studied in species of fish and...
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Riders in a peloton can reduce drag and so save energy by

What do the Tour de France and fossils have in common? | Susannah Lydon

theguardian.com
Brian Laverentz
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
05/24/2017 at 14:55. Facebook
"One of the earliest recorded instances of humans interacting with bee products comes from a modest spear point found in a Spanish cave, which was attached to its shaft with the aid of bee’s wax 40,000 years ago. Ancient rock art from such diverse places as southern Africa, Turkey, Bhutan, and Australia depict various aspects of bee hive life cycles, often with human figures attempting to...
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One of the earliest recorded instances of humans interacting with bee products

Honey, I love you: our 40,000-year relationship with the humble bee

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Richard Tagart
Quest to crack human intelligence code gets a major boost as research reveals more genes that have a bearing on cognitive skills
Quest to crack human intelligence code gets a major boost as research

Scientists identify 40 genes that shed new light on biology of intelligence

theguardian.com
'When he stepped out of his electrified cage in 1836, Faraday had shown that electricity was a force, not some imponderable fluid as many claimed. By the time he had shown that magnets could affect light and non-metallic materials such as glass, he was ready to introduce the use of the word “fields” for the first time, now a cornerstone concept in modern physics.'
When he stepped out of his electrified cage in 1836 Faraday had

The Faraday cage: from Victorian experiment to Snowden-era paranoia

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Ever since its discovery, graphene has been hailed as the 'wonder material'. So what is it that gets scientist excited about this one-atom thick allotrope of carbon? Find out in this week's podcast
Ever since its discovery graphene has been hailed as the wonder material

Is graphene really worth the hype – science weekly

theguardian.com
Charlotte Leedale
Alex Bellos sets Singapore maths problem to mark the second anniversary of his Monday puzzle column ... see if you can crack it
Alex Bellos sets Singapore maths problem to mark the second anniversary of

Can you solve it? The maths problem for 5-year-olds 'stumping' the web

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Toxic air impacts human body's ability to sleep well by affecting breathing patterns, scientists say
Toxic air impacts human bodys ability to sleep well by affecting breathing

Air pollution linked to poor sleep, study finds

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Serious musings about space warfare as experts draft legal document covering military law in outer space
Serious musings about space warfare as experts draft legal document covering military

The new rulebook for real-life star wars

theguardian.com
'Improving sleep could be a promising lifestyle intervention to reduce the risk of future weight gain.'
Improving sleep could be a promising lifestyle intervention to reduce the risk

Bad sleep makes it harder to keep your waistline down

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Students have expressed scorn over a biology exam question on ‘Victorian monkey memes’. So how much does teaching the history of science matter?
Students have expressed scorn over a biology exam question on Victorian monkey

The real importance of a silly-sounding GCSE question on Darwin | Jenny Rohn

theguardian.com
Colette Panaga
David Campbell
Jane Lambourne
Scientists and meteorologists from the Center for Severe Weather Research try to get close to supercell storms and tornadoes. They’re trying to better understand tornado structure and strength, how low-level winds affect and damage buildings, and to learn more about tornado formation and prediction.
Scientists and meteorologists from the Center for Severe Weather Research try to

Riders on the storm: the scientists who chase tornadoes - in pictures

theguardian.com
The findings, presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Porto, Portugal, may be the final death knell for the claim that it is possible to be obese but still metabolically healthy – or “fat but fit” – say scientists.
The findings presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Porto Portugal

No such thing as 'fat but fit', major study finds

theguardian.com
Martijn Weterings
Natalie Windsor
Sandra Auld
Humans can determine a dog’s mood by the sound of its growl, scientists have found, with women showing greater ability than men.
Humans can determine a dogs mood by the sound of its growl

Barking up the right tree: study shows we can understand dog growls

theguardian.com
David Foster
Mattie Yeo
"Psychologists found that people who had too little sleep were not only regarded as less attractive and in poorer health than when they had rested, they were also considered less appealing to socialise with."
Psychologists found that people who had too little sleep were not only

Looking tired can harm your social life, say researchers

theguardian.com
Jacob Cox
Pete White
Charlotte West
Researchers created the synthetic ovaries by printing porous scaffolds from a gelatin ink and filling them with follicles, the tiny, fluid-holding sacs that contain immature egg cells. In tests on mice that had one ovary surgically removed, scientists found that the implants hooked up to the blood supply within a week and went on to release eggs naturally through the pores built into the...
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Researchers created the synthetic ovaries by printing porous scaffolds from a gelatin

3D-printed ovaries allow infertile mice to give birth

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"Most of the modern day Komodo dragon’s diet consists of animals that are not native to the area. The Lesser Sunda islands, of which Flores and the other islands are part, were never connected to mainland Asia. Up until the Late Pleistocene, the only large herbivores present on the islands were dwarf elephants. Deer and pigs were introduced to the islands by modern humans some 4-5,000 years...
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Most of the modern day Komodo dragons diet consists of animals that

Here be dragons: the million-year journey of the Komodo dragon | Hanneke Meijer

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"It sounds bonkers but the latest piece of evidence that could favour a multiverse comes from the UK’s Royal Astronomical Society. They recently published a study on the so-called ‘cold spot’. This is a particularly cool patch of space seen in the radiation produced by the formation of the universe more than 13 billion years ago."
It sounds bonkers but the latest piece of evidence that could favour

Multiverse: have astronomers found evidence of parallel universes?

theguardian.com
Tirthasalil Sil
Joe Ward
John Alan Conte Jr
More famous for populating Wild West gangs, superhero movies and the New York subway, vigilantes are now found in all corners of professional life, a new survey has found. Over the course of their careers, more than half the people surveyed had experienced at least one “Dark Knight employee”, as researchers dubbed them, while 18% said they still worked with one.
More famous for populating Wild West gangs superhero movies and the New

Who left food in the fridge? The rise of the 'Dark Knight' workplace vigilante

theguardian.com
Charlotte Malcolm
Mammals evolved from ‘reptile-like’ ancestors. Whatever a creationist may tell you, there are no substantial gaps to cast doubt: the fossil evidence for this in unequivocal. It is one of the most beautiful illustrations of evolutionary change over time. However, the details of early mammal evolution are still in need of fleshing out. Many important soft features don’t preserve in stone. When...
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Mammals evolved from reptilelike ancestors Whatever a creationist may tell you there

New fossil mammal was the first ‘King’ of Scotland | Elsa Panciroli

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Despite their benefits, statins have been caught up in a storm of controversy, with critics questioning the safety and efficacy of the drugs after NHS guidelines advised that prescriptions should be extended to those at lower risk of heart attack.
Despite their benefits statins have been caught up in a storm of

Statin side-effects only felt by those who believe in them – study

theguardian.com
Karen B Ni Gheibhearnnaigh
Roger Kern
James Farwell