Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/24/2017 at 12:57. Facebook
Stargazers were treated to a spectacle when the Lyrid meteor shower lit up the night sky over the north-eastern province of Jilin at the weekend. The annual event usually occurs between 19 and 23 April when the Earth passes through the dusty tail of comet Thatcher
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/24/2017 at 11:51. Facebook
A group of marine biologists organised a #MarchForScience in the middle of the Pacific Ocean over the weekend. More than 600 marches were held around the world amid fears science is under threat from a 'post-truth' age
Michelle Vermeulen
Karan Agrawal
Julio Obregon Salazar
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/24/2017 at 11:30. Facebook
"We’re fascinated by creatures that crawl the line somewhere between human and animal, between natural/unnatural, between civilised/wild. By defining the feral, we define the normal. That’s why these stories capture our imaginations. The next time a feral child case hits the news, see how many of these features are mentioned. It’s like tragic-story bingo."
Were fascinated by creatures that crawl the line somewhere between human and

Wild stories: Why do we find feral children so fascinating? | Mary-Ann Ochota

theguardian.com
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/24/2017 at 11:00. Facebook
"I am a particle physicist, so I think it is ok to start by paraphrasing one of our heroes, Richard Feynman. Science is a way of trying not to fool ourselves.

And we can’t afford to be fools anymore, if we ever could. "
I am a particle physicist so I think it is ok to

Why I marched for science

theguardian.com
Jim Bertagnolli
Julio Obregon Salazar
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/21/2017 at 12:00. Facebook
Data released by the project on Thursday revealed eleven of the most promising signals detected, but after close inspection scientists concluded that the radiowaves probably came from humans rather than other intelligent lifeforms.
Data released by the project on Thursday revealed eleven of the most

No encounters: most ambitious alien search to date draws a blank

theguardian.com
Joe Hurdman
Justin Kase
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/20/2017 at 15:00. Facebook
On 12 April 2016, Russian entrepreneur, venture capitalist, and physicist Yuri Milner announced a new and ambitious initiative called Breakthrough Starshot. Kickstarted with $100 million, the initiative aims to develop and demonstrate new technology, which will enable unmanned space flight at 20% of the speed of light, in the hope of laying the foundations for a mission to Alpha Centauri – our...
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On 12 April 2016 Russian entrepreneur venture capitalist and physicist Yuri Milner

Breakthrough Starshot: getting to Proxima Centauri b – Science Weekly podcast

theguardian.com
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/20/2017 at 14:00. Facebook
"Jim Lovell, who is now 89, was already an experienced astronaut when he commanded Apollo 13. He had flown on two Gemini missions and was an astronaut on Apollo 8 with Frank Borman and William Anders. They orbited the moon 10 times before returning safely to Earth on 27 December 1968. In doing so, they became the first human beings to fly to the moon. Apollo 8 was a problem-free flight in...
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Jim Lovell who is now 89 was already an experienced astronaut when

Apollo 13: celebrating the unsung heroes of mission control

theguardian.com
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/20/2017 at 13:00. Facebook
No fundamental particles with negative mass have ever been discovered, meaning that there have never been any experimental insights into how they might behave – if, indeed, they exist. The latest study provides a new platform to study this hypothetical form of matter, by showing that under certain precise conditions, normal particles can be made to behave as though they had negative mass.
No fundamental particles with negative mass have ever been discovered meaning that

Scientists have created a fluid with negative mass – but what does it tell us?

theguardian.com
Pedro Miguel Pereyra Becker
Andrey Gorodyskiy
Severin Hir
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/20/2017 at 12:30. Facebook
The striking results have raised hopes for a treatment that staves off mental decline in old age, but researchers stressed that more studies, including human trials, are needed before the therapy can be considered for clinical use.
The striking results have raised hopes for a treatment that staves off

Umbilical cord blood could slow brain's ageing, study suggests

theguardian.com
Shri Babu
Neil Ball
Kirsty A Brown
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/20/2017 at 12:00. Facebook
"If someone is experiencing anorgasmia, they might go to the doctor about it. But often there is not much for the doctor to say. Since we don’t really understand how orgasm works, it’s very difficult to fix it when things go wrong. And since we don’t understand exactly what happens when things go right, there is a risk of being told something is wrong when it’s not, or vice versa, which can be...
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If someone is experiencing anorgasmia they might go to the doctor about

Why scientists should start taking orgasm seriously

theguardian.com
Lorena Arikamedoshika Woodfine
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/20/2017 at 11:30. Facebook
Jason Ditton at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics said the new exoplanet, known as LHS 1140b, was the most exciting he had seen in 10 years. “We could hardly hope for a better target to perform one of the biggest quests in science: searching for evidence of life beyond Earth,” he said.
Jason Ditton at the HarvardSmithsonian Center for Astrophysics said the new exoplanet

New contender in hunt for alien life discovered by astronomers

theguardian.com
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/20/2017 at 11:00. Facebook
"Let’s start with the 2015 election results. The Tories needed 323 seats to win a majority, and captured 330. To achieve this they won 11.3 million votes to Labour’s 9.3 million; but if you combined Labour’s vote with the Lib Dem, Green and SNP votes, a coalition could have beaten the Tories by over 3 million votes. That would surely have kicked Cameron out of power, right?"
Lets start with the 2015 election results The Tories needed 323 seats

Tactical voting to beat the Tories: does the maths equal a coalition?

theguardian.com
Phil Legg
Matthew James Blakemore
Duncan Simpson
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/19/2017 at 13:30. Facebook
"These types of adjustments to evolutionary trees might appear trivial, but our study, and many others like it, have a broader relevance that goes beyond their immediate impact. Establishing the interrelationships of animals, plants, fungi and bacteria to each other, to build a great tree of life, forms the basis of all biological science, for reasons I’ll try to make clearer. As a result,...
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These types of adjustments to evolutionary trees might appear trivial but our

How we revealed a new family tree for dinosaurs

theguardian.com
Richard Tagart
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/19/2017 at 12:30. Facebook
No longer are we simply debating whether experts should engage in public life because of an unsupported fear that science will be further politicized. Instead, scientists are exploring how they can best push back on actions that undermine the collection of data and development of independent analysis and, in turn, weaken our collective ability to address tough challenges. “We are a driving...
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No longer are we simply debating whether experts should engage in public

Why the global March for Science is already a success

theguardian.com
Alison Austin
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/19/2017 at 12:00. Facebook
An immense river that flowed from one of Canada’s largest glaciers vanished over the course of four days last year, scientists have reported, in an unsettling illustration of how global warming dramatically changes the world’s geography.
An immense river that flowed from one of Canadas largest glaciers vanished

Receding glacier causes immense Canadian river to vanish in four days

theguardian.com
Schuyler Humes
Amanda Betts
John Kasian
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/19/2017 at 11:30. Facebook
"It’s true that the course of natural philosophy down through the ages has been unsettling to humanity’s conception of itself. The universe discovered by science appears vast, impersonal and purposeless. And human beings, we now know, evolved on this planet mostly by accident, and live and breathe and have their being thanks to the complex operations of cells and molecules that, despite all...
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Its true that the course of natural philosophy down through the ages

Rob Newman thinks scientists belittle people. I sympathise: science is unsettling

theguardian.com
Ross John
Guillaume Combot
Jim Zen
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
04/19/2017 at 11:00. Facebook
Healthy volunteers who received LSD, ketamine or psilocybin, a compound found in magic mushrooms, were found to have more random brain activity than normal while under the influence, according to a study into the effects of the drugs.
Healthy volunteers who received LSD ketamine or psilocybin a compound found in

Psychedelic drugs induce 'heightened state of consciousness', brain scans show

theguardian.com
Yevhenia Velofastowa
Jean Noël
Stephen Hargreaves
Discovered in the mud of a shallow lagoon in the Philippines, a living creature of the species has never been described before – even though its existence has been known for more than 200 years thanks to fossils of the baseball bat-sized tubes that encase the creature.
Discovered in the mud of a shallow lagoon in the Philippines a

Bizarre bivalve: first living giant shipworm discovered in Philippines

theguardian.com
Anna Monika Monika
Milos Pesole
Yoky Baylen
"Archaeology and its related discipline, biological anthropology, can do more than just confirm or falsify historical narratives; it can reveal details of people’s lives (and deaths) unobtainable through other means. Paleopathology can tell us exactly how young men died on a July afternoon in 1863 in a Pennsylvania peach orchard, or how an older man spent the last few hours of his life 5,000...
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Archaeology and its related discipline biological anthropology can do more than just

Food for thought: reconstructing the diet of Napoleon's Grand Army | Jennifer Raff

theguardian.com
A team at Jerusalem’s Hebrew University has tested mine detection using bacteria genetically modified to give off a fluorescent signal when mines – often made out plastic – are close, which can then be detected with a laser
A team at Jerusalems Hebrew University has tested mine detection using bacteria

Glowing bacteria offer hope for safe detection of 100m landmines

theguardian.com
Yasmine M'rabet