Guardian Science
Guardian Science
07/20/2017 at 16:00. Facebook
The 2016 US election and a wealth of psychological data show how much our reasoning can be influenced by how information is framed
The 2016 US election and a wealth of psychological data show how

The power of framing: It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it

theguardian.com
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
07/20/2017 at 14:45. Facebook
"I am a philosopher of science and I have taken an active interest in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) over the past few years because DES — like most of the high-energy physics currently going on at CERN, which is also part of my research interests — raise important and surprisingly analogous methodological questions about how evidence, model-building, and ultimately theory choice are deeply... View more »
"I am a philosopher of science and I have taken an active

Cosmology and particle physics face surprisingly similar challenges

theguardian.com
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
07/19/2017 at 15:00. Facebook
Once thought to originate from the realm of the supernatural, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) have a well-documented history, with more recent times often seeing them linked to mental health issues. But with recent surveys suggesting that up to 10% of the population report hearing voices that nobody else can hear, could these hallucinations reveal the way our brains distinguish voices?... View more »
Once thought to originate from the realm of the supernatural auditory verbal

Hearing voices: the science of auditory verbal hallucinations - Science Weekly podcast

theguardian.com
Malcolm Hunter
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
07/19/2017 at 14:37. Facebook
"Speaking at a meeting in parliament, Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, drew comparisons with the thalidomide scandal, saying that there was evidence that mesh procedures, used to treat complications from childbirth, carry significantly more risk than official figures suggest."
"Speaking at a meeting in parliament Carl Heneghan professor of evidence based

Senior doctors call for public inquiry into use of vaginal mesh surgery in UK

theguardian.com
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
07/19/2017 at 13:36. Facebook
“We want to understand what beautiful places are composed of because there is a connection between beautiful places and people’s wellbeing,” said Chanuki Seresinhe, a researcher on the project at the University of Warwick and the Alan Turing Institute in London. “If we can have a computer look at the environment and tell us how beautiful it is, we can use it to develop a more fine-tuned... View more »
“We want to understand what beautiful places are composed of because there

Beauty spot or landscape blot? Computer trained to judge scenery

theguardian.com
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
07/19/2017 at 12:35. Facebook
Since the early 19th century, artists have depicted colourful – if sometimes fictional – dinosaurs and prehistoric environments, mingling science with unbridled fantasy.
Since the early 19th century artists have depicted colourful – if sometimes

Paleoart: the strange history of dinosaurs in art – in pictures

theguardian.com
Carol Wain
Emmanuel E Moses
Edgley Csr
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
07/19/2017 at 11:34. Facebook
"Reconstructing past population history accurately requires temporal and geographic diversity in sampling. It’s tremendously important. Someday we will have so many archaic genomes sequenced that a new one isn’t a big deal and doesn’t add very much to the panoply. But that day isn’t here yet, and so the recovery of genetic data from each new individual has the potential to make a huge... View more »
"Reconstructing past population history accurately requires temporal and geograp

Did human women contribute to Neanderthal genomes over 200,000 years ago?

theguardian.com
Damian John Ups
Conor Mckeown
James Hynes
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
07/19/2017 at 10:22. Facebook
"At one level extinction normal and natural. Most of the diversity of life on Earth that has ever existed is now gone, and all species will one day pass from being extant to being extinct. But although it is normal for species to die out, the normal rate is considered to be quite low. On average perhaps just one or two species go extinct in any given year out of all of the bewildering... View more »
"At one level extinction normal and natural Most of the diversity of

Past extinctions point to a current and future biodiversity crisis

theguardian.com
Milan Kreuschitz
Daniel Jude Mulcahy
Guardian Science
Guardian Science
07/18/2017 at 15:03. Facebook
"The story of the Royal Medals is only understood in the context of early 19th-century concern that British science was in “decline”, at least relative to its apparent advance in France and Germany. Such claims are hard to quantify, but it was clear that the laissez faire British state had been less active in supporting scientific research and recognising its practitioners."
"The story of the Royal Medals is only understood in the context

How British anxiety about European advances created a scientific prize | Rebekah Higgitt

theguardian.com
Alfred Russel Wallace's contribution to evolutionary theory being largely forgotten may be down to his own preference for avoiding fame and glory – as revealed by a new archive of his letters
Alfred Russel Wallace's contribution to evolutionary theory being largely forgotten may be

'Tired of medals': new letters reveal how Alfred Russel Wallace shunned Darwin's fame

theguardian.com
Richard Tagart
Venus In-Furs
Say hello to the 'water bear', the ultimate creature that can survive even an apocalypse
Say hello to the 'water bear' the ultimate creature that can survive even an apocalypse

Tardigrades: Earth’s unlikely beacon of life that can survive a cosmic catacylsm

theguardian.com
PAt K LAmba
Sarah Moncur
"Scientists claim to have pinpointed the biological root of domineering behaviour, locating a brain circuit that, when activated in mice, transformed timid individuals into bold alpha mice"
"Scientists claim to have pinpointed the biological root of domineering behaviour locating

Scientists discover brain's neural switch for becoming an alpha male

theguardian.com
Kristian Lander
Millie Wilson
Lawrence Nip
A long hours office culture can affect more than just your social life – long days at work can be bad for your heart as well, according to a major study
A long hours office culture can affect more than just your social

Long working days can cause heart problems, study says

theguardian.com
Carol Malcolm Baisden
MaRk StEvens
Luis M Olias
Shifu R. Careaga
Ian Michael Walden
Maya Wójcik
“We encoded images and a movie into DNA in a living cell which is fun, but it’s not really the point of the system. What we’re trying to develop is a molecular recorder that can sit inside living cells and collect data over time.”
“We encoded images and a movie into DNA in a living cell

Scientists pioneer a new revolution in biology by embedding film on DNA

theguardian.com
“This palpably indicates that the field isn’t limited to scientists sitting in their labs thinking about weird things. Quantum phenomena actually have a utility and can really deliver some significant new technologies.”
“This palpably indicates that the field isn’t limited to scientists sitting in

Scotty can you beam me up! Scientists teleport photons 300 miles into space

theguardian.com
Michael Kaiser
Cheech McGee
"Antidepressants were discovered largely by accident; Swiss scientists looking for treatments for schizophrenia in the 1950s realised a certain experimental substance caused euphoria in their subjects. And lo, antidepressants were born"
"Antidepressants were discovered largely by accident; Swiss scientists looking f

How do antidepressants actually work? | Dean Burnett

theguardian.com
Rachelle Anne Russell
Sandra Wagner
Mike Steven Bryant
The secret to a good night’s sleep later in life is having a good reason to get up in the morning
The secret to a good night’s sleep later in life is having

Sense of purpose aids sleep, US scientists find

theguardian.com
Adam Wojcik
Jithin Chand
Cian Foley
“People with hepatitis B infection may not be aware they are infected as infection mostly has no symptoms. As adults are the majority of infected individuals, vaccinating children will protect them in childhood from potential exposure to infected household or family members"
“People with hepatitis B infection may not be aware they are infected

Hepatitis B jab to be added to immunisations of babies born in UK

theguardian.com
Francesca Daldello
K.V. Andresen
Josiah Tay