London Review of Books
03/22/2017 at 13:55. Facebook
The cover of our new issue bore a striking resemblance to the view outside our window as we considered whether or not to go and get lunch.
London Review of Books
03/22/2017 at 12:46. Facebook
Our new issue is now online, featuring Iain Sinclair on the last London, Daniel Soar on the most expensive weapon ever built, Sheila Fitzpatrick on the Russian Revolution and Susan McKay on the Irish border.

Contents · Vol. 39 / No. 7

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London Review of Books
03/22/2017 at 09:27. Facebook
‘Nobody may lawfully expel an EU citizen who has made their life in Britain, not even Parliament’ – George Letsas on Brexit and the constitution, from the last issue.

LRB · George Letsas · Brexit and the Constitution

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‘There is a case for saying that Sutton Hoo does not mark the beginnings of Englishness, but its end’ – Rod Mengham on the Suffolk ship burial, from our blog.

Rod Mengham: Forever Not England

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Growing up in Cookstown in County Tyrone, I would occasionally wonder what it would be like to be Martin McGuinness’s son. There was an Oedipal twist to my unlikely fantasy, because I also used to imagine killing him.

LRB · Nick Laird · The dogs in the street know that

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London Review of Books
03/20/2017 at 18:28. Facebook
‘Dearest Pet’ – Wendy Doniger on bestiality, from the LRB archive.

LRB · Wendy Doniger · Calf and Other Loves

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London Review of Books
03/20/2017 at 12:45. Facebook
‘If you tried to give rock and roll another name,’ John Lennon said, ‘you might call it “Chuck Berry”.’

Alex Abramovich: Chuck Berry

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London Review of Books
03/20/2017 at 09:58. Facebook
‘Terrorists themselves felt terrorised’ – Gavin Jacobson on the French Revolution, from the latest issue.

LRB · Gavin Jacobson · There is no more Vendée

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London Review of Books
03/19/2017 at 18:30. Facebook
‘She was one of those GDR children who learned at an early age that you had to be careful what you said in public’ – Franziska Augstein on Angela Merkel, from 2011.

LRB · Franziska Augstein · Who is Angela Merkel?

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London Review of Books
03/19/2017 at 15:11. Facebook
And other recent letters to the Editor: lrb.co.uk/v39/n06/letters
London Review of Books
03/19/2017 at 11:37. Facebook
‘When he was asked what it was to be a Caribbean poet, he lapsed into silence, the chorus of insects and birds answering on his behalf’ – Tim Dee on Derek Walcott’s 84th birthday party, from the LRB archive.

LRB · Tim Dee · Diary

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London Review of Books
03/18/2017 at 16:28. Facebook
Goethe was grudging: ‘There’s a lot of poetry in the book, but no taste’ – Jeremy Adler on The Adventures of Simplicius Simplicissimus by Johann Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen, from the latest issue.

LRB · Jeremy Adler · Time to Rob the Dead

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London Review of Books
03/18/2017 at 11:43. Facebook
‘The eclipse of the author by the work is not an accident of Mallarmé criticism: it is Mallarmé’s principal literary discovery’ – Barbara Johnson on Stéphane Mallarmé, born #otd in 1842, from the archive.

LRB · Barbara Johnson · Mallarmé gets a life

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London Review of Books
03/17/2017 at 19:09. Facebook
London Review of Books
03/17/2017 at 15:21. Facebook
A poem by Derek Walcott from 1983. Read more: bit.ly/2mCRZRX
London Review of Books
03/17/2017 at 12:45. Facebook
London Review of Books
03/17/2017 at 09:50. Facebook
‘An exceptionally weak candidate for an everyman figure’ – Rivka Galchen on Kafka: the early years, from the latest issue.

LRB · Rivka Galchen · In the Nightmare Kitchen

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London Review of Books
03/16/2017 at 17:57. Facebook
Israeli visual history has always required the erasure of Palestinians.

Amjad Iraqi: ‘Only Sand and Bedouins’

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London Review of Books
03/16/2017 at 13:00. Facebook
‘It’s difficult to believe that there isn’t something demoralising, for Pret workers perhaps more than most in the high street, not only in having their energies siphoned off by customers, but also in having to sustain the tension between the performance of relentless enthusiasm at work and the experience of straitened material circumstances outside it’ – Paul Myerscough on where you’re going...
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LRB · Paul Myerscough · Short Cuts

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London Review of Books
03/16/2017 at 10:07. Facebook
‘I remembered that in Ancient Egypt the bird was a symbol of death and passage to the next world’ – J. Jason Mitchell on life and death between Libya and Lampedusa, from the latest issue.

LRB · J. Jason Mitchell · Short Cuts

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