When Jose Agredano Jr. walked onto the soccer field in Watsonville to play his final junior varsity game of the season last week, the last thing he expected was a heart attack. The Mercury News reports on this emotional story...

Mother saves son’s life on Watsonville soccer field

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Update: Jose was released Saturday February, 18, from Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford following an unexpected and life-threatening incident on Thursday, February 16. Doctors believe he suffered what’s known as a commotio cordis — cardiac arrest caused by a blunt impact to the chest.

Jose's mother, Gina, saved his life after he collapsed on a soccer field. Today he's in the...
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Less than a week ago a mother saved her 16-year-old son after he collapsed on the soccer field. The full story here: [ Bit.ly Link ] #CPR

Update to follow with results from his stress test.
Irregular heartbeats can be scary. As a parent, do you know when to take your child to the emergency room if they are experiencing such symptoms? Find out in our latest health tip from cardiologist, Dr. Michael Tran.

Dr. Tran is part of Pediatric Cardiology Associates, a team of healthcare professionals who specialize in the care of pediatric heart disease. Pediatric Cardiology Associates...
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Proud to have the first and only accredited adolescent #bariatric surgery program on the West Coast. Helping transform and create healthier lives for young people like Micaela.

Read about her story and our program here > [ Bit.ly Link ]

Adolescent Bariatric Surgery Program Receives Landmark Accreditation - Stanford Children's Health

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Proud to have the first and only accredited adolescent #bariatric surgery program on the West Coast. Helping transform and create healthier lives for young people like Micaela.

Read about her story and our program here > [ Bit.ly Link ]

Adolescent Bariatric Surgery Program Receives Landmark Accreditation - Stanford Children's Health

stanfordchildrens.org
An estimated one quarter of the population lives with a myocardial bridge, yet this heart condition is considered so benign that most medical schools don't even teach about it. #HearthMonth2017

Treating an overlooked heart condition - Stanford Children’s Health Blog

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A good time was had by all at our 4th Annual Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator Day. The day of education and community-building among patients and their families included fun and games. Patients were also treated to demos of the next phase in our virtual reality program. #ICD #VR

Learn more about how our team is using the latest techniques to correct all forms of heart rhythm problems [...
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This is so awesome! The Stanford University Dance Marathon is still going strong! So far this weekend they've raised $110,440 for patients like Ellie in our Bass Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases. Please join us in giving them a round of applause!
Today on Humans of Packard Children's: “After Jackson’s heart surgery in April, the craft room at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford was incredible. The first couple of days, Jackson said he didn’t want to go, which is abnormal for him, so he must not have been feeling well. But the child life specialists brought a couple craft project packages to his room. Those crafts in a bag were...
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As every athlete knows, practice makes perfect. Even when you apply thousands of casts a year, it can’t hurt to practice a little more.

Recently members of our orthopedics team were both doctor and patient—applying and removing their own casts and splints so they’ll be ready to provide the best care to our real patients. ortho.stanfordchildrens.org
"Despite the odds against him, Joey proved that he is a true warrior, and I can only hope that his story lets others know that anything is possible, no matter how insurmountable it seems in the moment." #HeartMonth2017

A Family's Journey - Stanford Children’s Health Blog

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UPDATE: Formerly conjoined twin, Erika, is well enough that she was released from the hospital Monday, February 13.

“It’s happening,” mother Aida Sandoval said as she walked with Erika in her arms through the hospital and readied her daughter for her first ride in a regular car seat. “It’s surreal to be taking her out of the hospital for the first time as an individual.”

Full update and...
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UPDATE: Eva and her formerly conjoined twin sister, Erika, are making good progress learning to live separately.

The 2½ -year-old sisters are happy, chatty and motivated to learn new skills as they recover at the hospital. #conjoinedtwins

Update on formerly conjoined twins - Stanford Children’s Health Blog

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First the conjoined twins separation in December and now heart valve replacement surgery…how virtual-reality techniques are being used to help patients. #HeartMonth2017

Virtual Reality imaging technology gives surgeons a better view into patient anatomy

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Last call! Send your Valentine’s card message and give hope to kids like Karla. Karla has been at our hospital for almost a year, waiting for her new heart. Karla’s parents have a special message for you (at 1:03, our hearts melt.)” #HeartMonth2017 supportLPCH.org/valentine
Happy Year of the Rooster! Thank you to C.M. Capital Foundation for bringing the Chinese New Year celebration to our hospital once again this year. Our patients loved celebrating with calligraphy, crafts, delicious food, music, and lion dancers!
Hana, a heart patient and nurse-in-training, is ready for Valentine’s Day! We’ve already received 580 valentine messages, but our goal is to get 1,000! We can’t wait to display your words of hope and healing at our hospital. Send your valentine online today: supportLPCH.org/Valentine #HeartMonth2017
Using stem cells and gene therapy to treat or cure disease may still sound like science fiction, but a scientific meeting at the Stanford School of Medicine last week emphasized all the fronts on which it is moving closer and closer to fact. #CuringIncurable

Advances in stem-cell and gene-therapy - Stanford Children’s Health Blog

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Meet Gage. He's one of the smallest children to be fitted with a HeartWare ventricular assist device (HVAD), normally used for adults. Gage is awaiting transplant, but you’d never know it to see him running around the playground at school. #HeartMonth2017

Living a full life on a VAD - Stanford Children’s Health Blog

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