Museum of London
Museum of London
yesterday at 09:30. Facebook
Does this left hand of a Roman bronze statue prove that the white clay object is an ancient yo-yo?! Find out here: [ Ow.ly Link ]
Does this left hand of a Roman bronze statue prove that the
Museum of London
Museum of London
04/22/2017 at 09:30. Facebook
The first London Marathon was run on 29 March 1981, to raise money for charity and good causes. This is a runner's kitbag used in the 1993 marathon. The race starts in Greenwich Park and winds past Canary Wharf, Tower Bridge and the Tower of London. The finishing line is at Buckingham Palace. Good luck to all those running tomorrow.
The first London Marathon was run on 29 March 1981 to raise
Helen Elizabeth Casey
Museum of London
Museum of London
04/21/2017 at 09:30. Facebook
This tin of Smith Kendon travel sweets issued to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II in 1977. To celebrate the jubilee, most manufacturers issued commemorative packaging incorporating the Union Jack or official portraits of the Queen. See it on display: [ Ow.ly Link ]
This tin of Smith Kendon travel sweets issued to commemorate the Silver
Chandler Vincent
Museum of London
Museum of London
04/20/2017 at 12:00. Facebook
City Now City Future is a first for the Museum of London. This year-long season of events will, through hundreds of FREE exhibitions, displays and events inspire conversation about the past, present and future of our cities.

Opening the season on 18 May are new artist commissions and installations, including:
Here and now: London portraits by Niall McDiarmid
Lady Lucy: Portraits for...
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City Now City Future is a first for the Museum of London
Museum of London
Museum of London
04/19/2017 at 09:30. Facebook
The concluding part in the Diary of a Georgian tourist series sees Elizabeth Chivers travel from Bedlam to Bath. Read on for an insight into her holiday: [ Ow.ly Link ]
The concluding part in the Diary of a Georgian tourist series sees
Museum of London
Museum of London
04/18/2017 at 09:30. Facebook
Language Class at the Archway School, February 1964. Miss Jones is instructing non-English speaking children how to ask for items at a greengrocers shop in English.
Language Class at the Archway School February 1964 Miss Jones is instructing
A complete Roman 250-400, colour-coat beaker from the Nene Valley in Cambridgeshire. Hunting scenes such as this one were common in the early production of Nene Valley Colour Coated Ware. The technique used, Barbotine, French for ceramic slip, or a mixture of clay and water was used to create the raised hare and hounds. On Display: [ Ow.ly Link ]
A complete Roman 250400 colourcoat beaker from the Nene Valley in Cambridgeshire
Kate O'Mara
Anthony Nelson
Adam Crighton
A hollow, stoneware ceramic egg, made in 2012 by an anonymous artist. One (no. 2664) of 5,000 eggs which were laid out in the shape of the River Thames on the South Downs, Sussex, as a work of art. The eggs were then deposited on Easter weekend 6th - 9th April 2012 into the River Thames near the Dartford Tunnel. All the eggs are either hand engraved or stamped with a a number and the word...
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A hollow stoneware ceramic egg made in 2012 by an anonymous artist
See What's on for families at Museum of London Docklands this Easter [ Ow.ly Link ]
See What's on for families at Museum of London Docklands this Easter
This Roman copper alloy medallion is a rare medallion of the Emperor Philip I. It was issued to mark the New Year celebrations in AD 245 and is only the second ever found in Europe. See it on display in our free major exhibition at Museum of London Docklands, Tunnel: The Archaeology of Crossrail. [ Ow.ly Link ]
This Roman copper alloy medallion is a rare medallion of the Emperor
See What's on for families at Museum of London this Easter: [ Ow.ly Link ]
See What's on for families at Museum of London this Easter:
Reliquary cross, as worn by Roman Catholics who faced persecution in England during the 17th century. The cross is hinged at the top and features compartments inside for keeping holy relics. Relics were believed to be pieces of the Cross or artefacts associated with saints and were thought to possess protective powers. Find out more: [ Ow.ly Link ]
Reliquary cross as worn by Roman Catholics who faced persecution in England
Covent Garden flower women, c.1877 standing outside St. Paul's Church, their regular spot through generations. By John Thomson.

Whilst Covent Garden Flower, Fruit and Vegetable Market was a wholesale market, there was room for a few sellers of nosegays to passers-by. Find out more: [ Ow.ly Link ]
Covent Garden flower women c1877 standing outside St Pauls Church their regular
Naomi Blaikie
Linda Lindars
Amy Hannigan
For almost two hundred years Vauxhall Gardens was London’s most famous Pleasure Garden.This poster from 1858 advertises a grand night ascent in Vauxhall's most famous balloon, the Royal Vauxhall, piloted by Captain W.H. Adams Junior.
It is on Display in the Expanding City gallery. [ Ow.ly Link ]
For almost two hundred years Vauxhall Gardens was Londons most famous Pleasure
One of London’s most iconic buildings, St. Paul’s Cathedral is often associated with the destruction that the Great Fire of London caused. This video looks at the rebuilding of this iconic landmark. Find out more at Fire! Fire! (closes 17 April). Tickets here: [ Goo.gl Link ]
Rebecca Harpur
Jewish tomb decorations (1791-1850) drawn from the three Jewish cemeteries then situated on or near Mile End Road.
The Old Sephardi Cemetery on the Mile End Road, founded in 1657, is the oldest surviving Jewish cemetery in the country.
Find out more here: [ Ow.ly Link ]
Jewish tomb decorations 17911850 drawn from the three Jewish cemeteries then situated
Anne-Maree Whitaker
Fire! Fire! closes in one week today, on 17 April. Learn about the Great Fire of 1666 in our interactive family-friendly exhibition. Book your place here: [ Ow.ly Link ]
Julia Milchard
Lauren Abbott
The first coffee house opened in London in 1652, but the phenomenon took off during the 18th century. They were written about in publications including 'Spectator' and advertised as social spaces where individuals could meet to debate on a range of contemporary subjects. Their popularity continued well into the 19th century and coffee houses remain a regular feature of urban areas today. [...
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The first coffee house opened in London in 1652 but the phenomenon
Matt Estrada Hague
Chris Jarvis
Lauren Conrad
Open Call for creative submissions. See your work at the Museum of London, on display as part of the City Now City Future season. Find out more and apply here: [ Ow.ly Link ] Deadline 8 May.
Open Call for creative submissions See your work at the Museum of
This fun Polychrome tin-glazed earthenware 'medallion' floor tile is decorated with a camel. Medallion tiles with figurative and animal subjects were popular in the Low Countries and London. These tiles were made in the Pickleherring factory in Southwark 1571-1615.
This fun Polychrome tinglazed earthenware medallion floor tile is decorated with a