Museum of London
yesterday at 10:30. Facebook
This is a hank of horsehair from 1910-1950. Horsehair was imported through London's docks for use in saddlery and the furniture industry. See this hair on display: Museum of London Docklands: Warehouse of the World: [ Ow.ly Link ]

By 1880, London docks were a hub for world trade. Until the outbreak of the Second World War, the sheds and warehouses that lined the river Thames housed every...
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Museum of London
01/22/2017 at 10:30. Facebook
With this many layers these ladies, drawn between 1870-1879, might just about stay warm in this cold weather. Beneath the image of the women is printed: 'The Fashions Expressly designed & prepared for The Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine'. ‘The Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine’ was founded in 1853 by journalist and publisher Samuel Beeton and aimed at female, middle-class readers. In 1860 the...
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Museum of London
01/21/2017 at 10:30. Facebook
This photography from 1908-1910 depicts Emmeline Pankhurst addressing crowds at Trafalgar Square. Traditionally used by all political and campaigning groups for rallies and demonstrations, Trafalgar Square is one of the few open public spaces in central London large enough to hold a crowd. Here Emmeline Pankhurst addresses a crowd of predominantly male onlookers. Many of these men would have...
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Museum of London
01/20/2017 at 11:09. Facebook
Museum of London
01/20/2017 at 09:30. Facebook
Today is the last day to see the 260 year old Lord Mayor's coach before it is taken off display for maintenance. The Coach will return to the temporary Coach House at Guildhall, ahead of its involvement in The Lord Mayor’s Show 2017. It is currently on display in the City Gallery: [ Ow.ly Link ]
Museum of London
01/19/2017 at 15:29. Facebook
The Great Fire of 1666 impacted existing buildings and inspired the creation of others. Watch our video to find out more. Become a true history buff by visiting Fire! Fire! - [ Ow.ly Link ]
Museum of London
01/19/2017 at 14:00. Facebook
At 6.52pm on Friday 19 January, 1917, a massive explosion tore through Brunner Mond & Co munitions factory in Silvertown, East London. Fifty tonnes of TNT exploded, in what remains London’s largest ever explosion. 900 local homes were flattened, and 60,000 buildings damaged throughout London. Tragically, the explosion was also a humanitarian disaster, with 73 killed – including many local...
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Museum of London
01/19/2017 at 11:44. Facebook
Tune into the Robert Elms show on BBC radio right now to hear our curator Lauren Parker talk about our forthcoming season, City Now City Future.
More on the season here: [ Ow.ly Link ]

BBC - Radio London - Home

bbc.co.uk
Museum of London
01/18/2017 at 10:30. Facebook
Today is Museum Selfie Day and we’d love to see your pictures of yourself in our museums, or pictures of your favourite objects.
This fabulous theatrical portrait portrays an unknown actor. Theatrical souvenirs like this would have been sold plain for colouring and tinselling at home. The background is printed 'Sold Wholesale & Retail, by J.Redington at his Print & Tinsel Warehouse 208 Hoxton...
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Museum of London
01/17/2017 at 13:31. Facebook
An 18th century button made from copper alloy. This button is from the same century and is similar in design to the buttons on this suit jacket. The buttons on this jacket are covered in silver wire and the suit itself would have been embroidered with silver thread and spangles, making it glitter in candlelight.

The suit was made from broad cloth, which at the time, was a term commonly used...
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Museum of London
01/17/2017 at 13:31. Facebook
An 18th century button made from copper alloy. This button is from the same century and is similar in design to the buttons on this suit jacket. The buttons on this jacket are covered in silver wire and the suit itself would have been embroidered with silver thread and spangles, making it glitter in candlelight.

The suit was made from broad cloth, which at the time, was a term commonly used...
View details ⇨
Museum of London
01/17/2017 at 10:00. Facebook
What does it mean to live in a truly global city? We invite you to join the conversation in the Museum of London's first ever season. Find out more about City Now City Future, opening May 2017 until April 2018. [ Goo.gl Link ]
We care for an internationally important Bronze Age collection of around 900 objects including this Early Bronze Age; c. 1700BC ogival* dagger. The dagger was found in the Thames at Bermondsey (off Jamaica Road). Many daggers of this type are found in graves, others have been recovered from rivers. It is possible that this example was originally buried in a grave that was subsequently eroded...
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At 3.30pm on 15 January 1867, London’s passion for ice-skating was shaken by tragedy. As up to 500 revellers enjoyed an afternoon of skating on the frozen ornamental pond in Regent’s park, the ice suddenly shattered with devastating consequences. Skaters desperately struggling to save their lives quickly disappeared into the deep waters below. The rescue operation took several days to recover...
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On this day 1878 Alexander Graham Bell demonstrated the telephone to Queen Victoria.

This telephone, produced between 1880-1890 was patented by Alexander Graham Bell. In Bell's early telephone the receiver and the transmitter were the same. It was manufactured at the Telegraph Works in Silvertown.
It’s Friday the 13th, what better time to talk about our ‘witch bottle’. This 17th century stoneware Bartmann jug (also known as a Bellarmine) made in Frechen, Germany has been repurposed as a charm against witchcraft. It was found with a heart-shaped piece of felt pierced with pins and eleven nails inside. Learn more about superstition in London's history in our exclusive gallery tour 28...
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Long snowy commute? Read our latest Discover post: Roman rubbish reveals lost Londinium by Owen Humphries.

Roman rubbish reveals lost Londinium

museumoflondon.org.uk
What do you think this object is? Let us know in the comments section below. Find out more at Fire! Fire! - [ Ow.ly Link ]
This pot is decorated with smith’s tools. Found at the bottom of a well, it may have contained offerings to the god Vulcan to ensure success in industry. This pot features in new display: Working the Walbrook which features an exceptional collection of rare metal Roman artefacts found in the Walbrook Valley. Free to visit and open today: [ Ow.ly Link ]
A virginal (referred to as a 'pair of virginals' in the 1600s) is an early type of keyboard instrument like a piano. They were expensive, but light and one of the things that people rescued in the Great Fire of London 1666. Samuel Pepys noted in his diary, 'River full of lighters and boats taking in goods, and good goods swimming in the water, and only I observed that hardly one lighter or...
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