Renowned crane conservationist George Archibald—co-founder of the International Crane Foundation—just returned from a global tour to meet every species of crane in the wild. Here's what he saw.

Around the World in 15 Cranes

audubon.org
You can't go wrong with native plants: They help fight climate change, save water, and provide food and shelter for birds.

Why Native Plants Are Better for Birds and People

audubon.org
Jeff Karnes, our featured photographer this week on Instagram, captured this tender moment between a Wood Stork and its young.

Want to see more beautiful photos like this? Follow along: [ Instagram.com Link ]
Looking like a piece of bark come to life, the Brown Creeper crawls up trunks of trees, rooting out insect eggs and other morsels missed by more active birds.

Brown Creeper

audubon.org
With your gift to Audubon, you have the power to help secure a safer future for birds.

Your gift protects birds, today and tomorrow.

action.audubon.org
A proposal in Wyoming would allow commercial interests to harvest Greater Sage-Grouse and their eggs to raise birds in captivity. Here is why this bill, which has no basis in sound conservation science, will not support sage-grouse conservation efforts whatsoever.

Proposed Wyoming Bill Allowing Sage-Grouse Captive Rearing Is Deeply Flawed

audubon.org
Go behind the scenes at Audubon Sharon in Connecticut, which hosts a wildly successful wildlife rehabilitation program—an average of 350 birds come in for rehab each year! [ Ow.ly Link ]
New to the world of flycatchers? Why not ease into it by identifying your first phoebe?

Birdist Rule #61: Find Your First Phoebe, the Gateway Flycatcher

audubon.org
Congress is moving quickly to gut the Endangered Species Act, America’s strongest and most important law for protecting wildlife. Tell your members of Congress to oppose efforts to dismantle this critical legislation—take action today: [ Ow.ly Link ]
After losing their nest during a wild and windy night in Pittsburgh last week, Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania's famous Bald Eagles have already built a new nest and possibly even laid a new egg—an unprecedented achievement.

Pittsburgh’s Famous Bald Eagles Lost Their Nest Tree, But They Aren't Giving Up

audubon.org
Though conservation efforts kept the Greater Sage-Grouse off the Endangered Species List in 2015, there's still work to do to protect critical sagebrush habitat and the many species that depend on it.

Greater Sage-Grouse

audubon.org
We're sharing beautiful bird photography from Jeffrey P Karnes photography this week on Instagram! Follow along to see stunning photos like this Roseate Spoonbill in flight. [ Instagram.com Link ]
Owls aren’t always the secluded, deep-woods birds we make them out to be. In fact, they could be lurking a lot closer than you think.

A Guide to Finding Urban Owls

audubon.org
Can't tell the difference between Greater and Lesser Scaups? You're not alone—scaups confused no lesser an expert than John James Audubon himself.

Even John James Audubon Couldn't Tell the Difference Between Scaup Ducks

audubon.org
The Crissal Thrasher usually manages to stay out of sight while hiding in thickets. Its presence is revealed mainly through its calls and song. Learn more about this desert bird: [ Ow.ly Link ]
With the help of Audubon Minnesota and some controlled fires, a local school recently restored an overgrown field into original prairie habitat.

To Turn a Schoolyard Into an Outdoor Classroom, Just Add Native Plants

audubon.org
Elusive Great Gray Owls live in California's Sierra Nevada and have fascinated researchers for a century, but studying them has never been easy.

After 100 Years, Scientists Are Finally Starting to Understand the Mysterious Great Gray Owl

audubon.org
A new app called Song Sleuth lets you ID birds by their calls. So how did it do in the field?

Testing Out Song Sleuth, a New App That Identifies Birds by Their Calls

audubon.org
Have you ever spotted a beautiful Violet-green Swallow? [ Ow.ly Link ]
The Steller's Eider is a year-round inhabitant of the Arctic. Abundant body fat and thick insulating plumage allow this rare sea duck to thrive in the tundra. Audubon Alaska is working to protect several Important Bird Areas in the Arctic region that species like this rely on.