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National Gallery of Art
12/04/2016 at 17:47. Facebook
Hans Mielich was the leading painter in Bavaria in the mid 16th-century. After a trip to Rome in 1542, Mielich settled in his native Munich, becoming court painter to Albrecht V, the Duke of Bavaria.

What do you notice first in this portrait? The sitter's large scale, dignified bearing, and richly decorated jacket suggest someone of great power and importance. In the background, visible...
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Asher Brown Durand specialized in landscapes. Durand's landscapes are precise, with a subtle treatment of light and texture that conveys a contemplative or poetic mood. His careful attention to specific details and his meticulous draftsmanship are evident in "Forest in the Morning Light." This is one in a series of "tree portraits" painted by Durand between the mid-1840s and the mid-1870s....
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National Gallery of Art
12/02/2016 at 17:45. Facebook
Georges Seurat was born on this day in 1859. Take a careful look at his "Seascape at Port-en-Bessin, Normandy," painted in 1888. What do you notice first in this work of art?

Seurat's "Seascape" illustrates the technique called pointillism. The artist was a neoimpressionist, interested in applying contemporary color theory in a rigorous way. He and other neoimpressionists would juxtapose...
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National Gallery of Art
12/01/2016 at 17:45. Facebook
Through the 1920s, Henri Matisse stayed in Nice, France from late fall to early spring of each year. "Pianist and Checker Players" is set in the artist's Nice apartment. We notice distinct elements of Matisse's world: the empty armchair where the artist might sit, his violins hanging from the armoire, and his drawings and paintings tacked to the wall.

The pictorial organization of the...
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National Gallery of Art
11/30/2016 at 17:20. Facebook
Meindert Hobbema studied under the noted landscape artist Jacob van Ruisdael. Quite a few of Hobbema's compositions evolved from the work of his erstwhile master. The artist approached nature in a straightforward manner, depicting picturesque, rural scenery enlivened by the presence of peasants or hunters.

In "A Farm in the Sunlight," we see a half-timbered farmhouse with a high-peaked roof....
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National Gallery of Art
11/28/2016 at 17:24. Facebook
For a new text panel in our gallery that features the Shaw Memorial, we wanted to provide visitors with a photographic reference for William MacLeod’s "Maryland Heights: Siege of Harpers Ferry," a recent addition to the room. In this painting, Union soldiers are camped at Maryland Heights, the highest defensive position above Harpers Ferry. Strategically located at the confluence of the...
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Throughout her career, Nancy Graves mined the world of natural science for her imagery. Her dual interest in science and art started with childhood visits to the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where her father worked. In the late 1970s, Graves became interested in archaeology.

What does "Agualine" remind you of? In this painting, the brown and black lines dancing across the...
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A calorie-free, guiltless treat at the National Gallery. This weekend is your last chance to consume Damien Hirst's "Last Supper."

The 13 prints that make up the "Last Supper" series refer to the number gathered at the biblical Last Supper. Each print features a pharmaceutical label that has been altered. The names of medicines have been replaced with those of common British foods...
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Happy Thanksgiving! The Gallery is open until 5:00pm today.

We're thankful for all of our visitors—whether you've been to the Gallery or not—and how you share your unique perspectives with us each day.

Pablo Picasso, "Le Dindon (The Turkey)," 1941/1942, aquatint in black laid paper, Geiser/Baer, no. 593, State iv/iv, Gift of Mrs. Robert A. Hauslohner © 2012 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists...
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Can you spot the turkey in this painting?

George Caleb Bingham was one of the most important American painters of genre subjects in the mid-19th century. His series of scenes of life and work on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers established his reputation. "The Jolly Flatboatmen" depicts a group of men who, after accomplishing the hard work of rowing their flatboat upstream and loading it...
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"One of the most engaging images in our exhibition, 'Drawings for Paintings in the Age of Rembrandt,' is this large black and red chalk drawing, 'A Standing Girl with Her Hands under Her Apron,' c. 1620 (left, Lent by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II). Hendrick Avercamp, who was a deaf mute, was famous for his paintings of skaters on frozen waterways in the midst of winter. In anticipation of...
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Eugéne Boudin specialized in small-scale oils. In his work, he would focus on depicting contemporary vacationers at the beaches of Normandy. Boudin made excursions along the coast to sketch the appearance of the sky and sea in open air. When he met Claude Monet in the early 1860s, he recommended Monet paint with the same practice.

Let your eye wander over "The Beach at Villerville," painted...
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In 1973, Susan Rothenberg spontaneously sketched the image of a horse. This subject 's preoccupied the artist until 1980. She later recalled: "I had been doing abstract paintings, using a central dividing line so as to keep the painting on the surface and call attention to the canvas... the horse was something that happened on both sides of my line. The image held the space and the line kept...
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Postimpressionism is a catchall label applied to artists whose work had impressionism at its roots. Many of these artists exhibited in the impressionist exhibitions. Yet the postimpressionists came to reject the impulse toward naturalism that had been a driving force behind impressionism.

Take a look at Georges Seurat's "Study for 'La Grande Jatte'," painted in 1884/1885. The artist used a...
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While Sir Thomas Lawrence preferred history painting, talent and necessity made him a portraitist. Lawrence had a great natural gift for fluent linear rhythms and for the dramatic uses of light and color.

Let your eye wander over "Lady Mary Templetown and Her Eldest Son." Do you see a story taking place in this work of art? Composed, gentle, and serene, Lady Templetown is a woodland goddess...
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Take a look at these two small, bronze sculptures, "Box in the Form of a Crab" and "A Crab on a Toad." Works like these record the convergence of art and science in 16th-century Italy. Both are likely "life casts;" what do you think this means?

An artist likely formed the plaster molds for each bronze from actual animal specimens collected in nature. A technique dating back to Roman...
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Few artists could match Giovanni Battista Moroni's skill in depicting the appearance of his sitters. The identity of the gentleman in this penetrating portrait is a mystery. For a long time the painting was thought to be by Titian and to represent that artist's ideal of a schoolmaster. But according to another tradition, the picture got its name because Titian admired it and learned so much...
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In the 1930s, Stuart Davis's creative output was dedicated to murals. The artist was hired by the WPA to create an abstract mural for a low-income housing project in Brooklyn. Davis’s "Study for Swing Landscape," shown here, was created in 1937-1938 in preparation for the artist’s Williamsburg housing mural, "Swing Landscape." He insisted that this work "leave a single impression" on the...
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Claude Monet was born on this day in 1840. In the last decades of his life, the artist's prized water garden at Giverny became a subject the artist often explored.

Take a careful look at "The Japanese Footbridge." What do you notice in this work of art? This work is unified by the treatment of the water's surface. Here, the sky has disappeared from the painting; the lush foliage rises all the...
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After several complaints from viewers, police arrived at the Dwan Gallery in 1963 to investigate Kienholz’s "Back Seat Dodge ’38." Why do you think visitors were complaining?

Visit our special exhibition, "Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery 1959-1971," to see what all the fuss was about: go.usa.gov/xKtMF.

Edward Kienholz, “Back Seat Dodge ‘38," c. 1964, paint, fiberglass and flock, 1938...
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