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Believe it or not, divers and conservationists say the uptick in incidents could actually be beneficial to the species.

Why Sharks Are Getting Stuck in Diver Cages

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Explorer Kenny Broad and team are currently under the Bahamas (yes, you read that right) diving the phenomenal blue holes. Follow the expedition daily!

Blue Holes Expedition: Rocks, Water, and a Workout

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South Africa’s epic KwaZulu-Natal sardine run brings millions of fish near the coast—which in turn attract scores of hungry animals.

Watch Sharks, Whales and Other Predators Swarm a Massive Fish Run

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A diver keeps a close watch on a tiger shark in the Bahamas. But the scene may not be as dangerous as it looks: Tigers rely on surprise to hunt prey and are unlikely to attack divers who keep them in sight.

Nat Geo's Best Photographs of 2016

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It's still there. Seventy-five years later, the U.S.S. Arizona is still resting on the seafloor in Pearl Harbor, asleep in 40 feet of gray silty water. It's been there since the morning of December 7, 1941, when 353 Japanese planes mounted a surprise assault on American naval forces stationed in Haw...

75 Years On, Pearl Harbor Survivors Forgive-But Can't Forget

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Scientists are discovering more mutated fish, possibly due to genetic abnormalities from overfishing.

Two-Headed Sharks Keep Popping Up—No One Knows Why

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Humpback whales normally travel in pods of two to three individuals, but this stunning footage shows a much larger group migrating off the coast of Cape Town, South Africa.

Watch: Mesmerizing Drone Footage of Humpback Whale Pod

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Did you know? Lionfish sometimes spread their fins and heard fish into confined spaces—the easier to eat them.

Red Lionfish | National Geographic

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Photographer David Doubilet seeks to understand the effects of climate change and human intervention on sea life.

Going to Great Depths to Illuminate Hidden Underwater Worlds

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More than a hundred million sharks are killed each year, primarily for their fins. Brian Skerry goes to extraordinary lengths to highlight their importance—and show us their beauty.

Through a Photographer's Lens, Sharks Get a Makeover

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"It is the blue heart of coastal East Africa—an unspoiled stretch of coastline that must be protected at all costs—for our ocean heritage."

An Explorer's Guide to Mozambique

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Giant mantas are one of the iconic marine species of the Revillagigedo Islands. They can grow to massive sizes, weighing in at maximums of nearly two tons, and reaching wingspans of up to seven meters. Although they are considered vulnerable, their curious, charismatic nature attracts thousands of tourists to dive with them every year. During the Pristine Seas team expedition to the...
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Some Florida fishermen say Atlantic goliath groupers are eating too many fish, but scientists argue the behemoths still need our protection.

800-Pound Groupers Making a Comeback-But Not Everyone's Happy

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Lead by Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala, Nat Geo's Pristine Seas project is exploring and protecting some of the last truly wild places in the ocean. Find out how you can support this critical work. #GivingTuesday

National Geographic's Pristine Seas Project

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Nat Geo Explorer Shannon Switzer Swanson spent her youth surfing and sailing. Now she is diving into marine biology to investigate the aquarium fish trade. #LetsExplore

Nat Geo Adventurers of the Year | To Save Fragile Ocean Fish, This Surfer Turned to Science

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In January 2017 the Nat Geo Pristine Seas team will conduct a 5-week scientific expedition to the remote Tristan da Cunha archipelago of the south Atlantic, in partnership with the Tristan da Cunha government and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. The expedition will help the Tristan community fulfill its ambition of establishing a regime for protecting the waters across the entire...
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This great white shark was photographed off Cape Cod, Massachusetts where sharks are rising in numbers, but scientists are feuding over rights to study them.

Great White Fight: Scientists Feud Over Shark Tagging

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"The ocean is not too big to fail. These precious places could easily be lost, and few would even realize it. My hope is that we all look to the future, and take the action necessary to ensure a rich future for all." - Nat Geo Explorer Brian Skerry

Election Issues Through the Lens of National Geographic Photographers

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Did you know? Some predators, such as tiger sharks and sea snakes, are unbothered by the pufferfish’s natural toxins.

Pufferfish Pictures and Facts - National Geographic

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