PBS Parents
02/24/2017 at 18:40. Facebook
“Your baby is picking up useful knowledge about language even though they’re not actually learning words.”

Language Lessons Start in the Womb

nytimes.com
PBS Parents
02/24/2017 at 17:15. Facebook
A technique we can all use from time to time. #EverydayLearning
PBS Parents
02/24/2017 at 14:19. Facebook
What do reading a map, building a block tower and loading the dishwasher have in common? They are all activities that strengthen "spatial reasoning," a skill set that is important for success in math and science.

Spatial Skills: The Secret Ingredient to Children's STEM Success

pbs.org
"Study after study shows that early reading with children helps them learn to speak, interact, bond with parents and read early themselves, and reading with kids who already know how to read helps them feel close to caretakers, understand the world around them and be empathetic citizens of the world."

Perspective | Why it’s important to read aloud with your kids, and how to make it count

washingtonpost.com
Reading to a pet allows children to focus on the animal instead of feeling self-conscious. You can try this with a stuffed animal, as well, if you don't have pets in the home or at school. The most important thing is to give your child a little privacy as they read to their trusted friend (real or not!), which can help them feel safe from the judgement of others.

How Reading Aloud to Therapy Dogs Can Help Kids Who Are Struggling

ww2.kqed.org
It’s easy for kids (and parents!) to see math as an isolated activity. They might think of it as just counting, or adding, or something they do for 40 minutes a day at school. But if we want kids to think like mathematicians, we need to take math off the page and into the real world. Everywhere we go, we are surrounded by math. Here's one example -- the kitchen!

Kitchen Math: How Mealtime Can Support Kids' Number Sense

pbs.org
Few things say “I love you” better than reading to young children.

Books to read to your little loves this Valentine’s Day

washingtonpost.com
The recipe first appeared in "Big Bird's Busy Book," from the 1970s.

Cookie Monster's Famous Sugar Cookie Recipe

thekitchn.com
In the NEW Daniel Tiger for Parents app, you can work with your child on sharing, trying new foods, what to do with mad feelings, and more. The app features over two dozen Daniel Tiger songs, supporting videos from Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood, and helpful hints for parents about the important skills children need to be ready for school and life.

App Store: [ To.pbs.org Link ]
Google Play: [...
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You may have seen it by now. A recent study found that girls as young as six believe that brilliance is a male trait. And that’s not all. The study also found that by age six girls steer themselves away from activities they believe are for people who are “really, really smart.” So what are parents of young girls to do? Here are some ideas:

How to Raise a Self-Confident Girl

pbs.org
We’ve all heard that “it takes a village” to raise a child — but how do parents manage the village? How do you make sure your mother-in-law is enforcing the same rules you are? How do you explain your child’s individual needs to the caregiver? Here are some tips for getting the most from your support network:

How to Ensure All of Your Child's Caregivers Are Enforcing the Same Rules

pbs.org
The words we use have a big impact on teaching and inspiring our children to help -- whether that be with simple household chores or learning to care for others. Here's how:

Encouraging Your Child to Become a "Helper"

pbs.org
We know we should set rules about screen time and how our children interact with others online. But how much do we know about the rules they set themselves? This article gives some advice for parents of older children about discussing social media. An excerpt below:

"Parents often feel as if their children’s smartphones are portals to another world — one that they know little to nothing about...
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The Unspoken Rules Kids Create for Instagram

nytimes.com
When the school opened up for parents to wash clothes, those adults became more engaged. Parents could spent time at the school, meet staff and get comfortable with the building.

How Clean Clothes Can Help Kids with Chronic Absences at School

ww2.kqed.org
"Parents know that PBS KIDS makes a difference in their children's lives, which is why so many have said they would value having access to our content throughout the day."

Soon Your Kids Can Watch PBS Shows 24/7

parents.com
Long days and nights are a recipe for frustration, but sometimes there's just no way around it. It’s important to understand how your child’s temperament can affect his or her ability to cope with overwhelming situations. If he craves alone time for play, for example, bring a few small toys and find a quiet corner where he can recharge. If she doesn’t know how to slow down until she collapses...
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How to Avoid Holiday Meltdowns

pbs.org
There’s no one strategy that works for every child. But as we sort out what's best for our own families, what can be helpful is understanding where irrational or bad behavior is coming from and remembering how much our emotions affect how our children react. Here are some things to keep in mind:

The Discipline Dilemma: Finding an Approach That Works for Your Child and Family

pbs.org
"...it’s not always easy to know how to connect. By their nature, adolescents aren’t always on board with our plans for making the most of family time and they aren’t always in the mood to chat. Happily, the quality parenting of a teenager may sometimes take the form of blending into the background like a potted plant."

What Do Teenagers Want? Potted Plant Parents

nytimes.com
While schools across the globe race to create fun and engaging STEM programs for little kids, the truth is that children will create their own STEM labs at home if we let them. When unstructured play becomes the norm, kids become builders, scientists, mathematicians and architects -- simply because they can!

Every Child Is an Architect

pbs.org