What are some of your favorite spots in Redwood for viewing wildlife in its natural habitat?

With 40 miles of coastline this park is home to a number of marine mammals too! Big to little Redwood is busting at the seams with wildlife, well maybe not busting but there is quite a lot.

Photo: S. Gayner
What are some of your favorite spots in Redwood for viewing wildlife
Chelsea Nied
Kevin Cornish
Wildflower Watch: Salt-N-Pepa here!

Nemophila menziesii var. atomaria spotted in the Bald Hills. Common name: salt and pepper

NPS Photo
Wildflower Watch SaltNPepa here Nemophila menziesii var atomaria spotted in the Bald
Becky Ward Hines
Saturday Survival Skills: Climate Series- Temperature

The North Coast maintains a relatively mild climate throughout the year, with winter temps between 40-50° F (4.5-10° C) and summers at 50-60° F (10-15.5° C). Coast redwoods don't handle extreme heat or cold as well as their cousins, the Giant Sequoias, so the moderate coastal temperatures make for the perfect climate to allow redwoods to...
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Saturday Survival Skills: Climate Series Temperature
Linda Cooper
Sammi Sprouse
Paul Ybarrondo
"UNLESS someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not." - The Lorax, Dr. Seuss

#EarthDay

Photo: S. Alexander
UNLESS someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing is going
Mjane Richmond
Lynn Zander
Kathryn Quickert
Where's your favorite place to walk your dog?

For a pet-friendly redwood adventure, bring your leashed pup to Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway! This paved road (currently closed to vehicles) winds through the old-growth forest in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

Pets aren't allowed on trails, but they can hang out on beaches, in campgrounds, and along roads. Dogs must be leashed at all...
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Where's your favorite place to walk your dog
Redwood National and State Parks (NPS)
Kris Moore
Jacob Mason
Wildflower Watch:

How can you tell the difference between a redwood and a dogwood tree?

The bark!

The flowers give it away, too.

Photo: B. Maggetti / Redwood National Park, Little Bald Hills
Wildflower Watch How can you tell the difference between a redwood and
What do national parks mean to you?

It is National Park Week! While it is always a good time to visit a national park, this upcoming weekend Saturday, April 22 and Sunday, April 23 parks will be fee free. So get out there and #findyourpark.

Photo: S. Gayner
What do national parks mean to you It is National Park Week
Karen Layou
Kris Moore
Stacy Scammon Dundas
Micro Mondays - Exploring the small but important pieces of your park.

When you visit Redwood National and State Parks (RNSP), you often think BIG. Big trees and big elk may be the first thing to catch your eye. But even the smallest things play an important role in the redwood forest. So on Monday we are thinking small, and looking at the ‘micro’ inhabitants of RNSP. #MicroMonday...
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Micro Mondays Exploring the small but important pieces of your park
Eric Simpson
"One touch of nature makes the whole world kin." -William Shakespeare

Photo: S. Alexander
"One touch of nature makes the whole world kin" William Shakespeare
Amber Kay Drake
Lara Martin
Norma Snyder Schweizer
Saturday Survival Skills: Climate Series

Redwoods have historically grown in coastal northern California and extreme southern Oregon (but nowhere else in the world) due in part to the area’s climate. The next few Saturday posts will be devoted to explaining how the North Coast climate contributes to the survival of the redwood forest. Stay tuned!

Image Credit: Save the Redwoods League
Saturday Survival Skills: Climate Series
Krista Maureen
Annie Vance
Carol Nelson
Tribal friends, Redwood rangers and Chilean rangers hope you too have fun exploring this 360 view of the alerce forest. Our sister-park has sooo much natural and cultural history in common. CONAF Yurok Tribe Tolowa Dee-ni' Nation Parque Nacional Alerce Costero
NPS Photo: G Litten
Tribal friends Redwood rangers and Chilean rangers hope you too have fun
Danial Stutz
Keith Carey
Gayle Smith
This week has been incredible for our park rangers and tribal partners. It is part of our "sister-park" relationship with Alerce Costero National Park in Chile. Over ceremonies, walks, and tea we have been meeting with Mapuche tribal leaders and communities. All the tribal members shared their experiences and struggles to maintain their cultures as national parks are expanded into their...
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This week has been incredible for our park rangers and tribal partners
"A rainy day is the perfect time for a walk in the woods." -Rachel Carson

Our rain gauges recorded 100 inches (254 cm) of rainfall since October 1, 2016. It’s been over 30 years since the park has seen this much rain!

NPS Video
Matt Inman
Rose Barton
Rayne Schmidt
This week, Redwood rangers and representatives from the Tolowa Dee-ni' Nation, Elk Valley Rancheria, and Yurok Tribe travelled 6,000 miles to our sister-park, Parque Nacional Alerce Costero. The trip is building cultural relationships with our park partners and the Chilean Mapuche community. Everyone is finding the cultures have many similar stories, practices and struggles. Just seeing this...
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This week Redwood rangers and representatives from the Tolowa Deeni Nation Elk
John Laine
Mike White
Crista Stewart
Saturday Survival Skills: Banana Slugs

Bright colors often signal that an animal is poisonous or dangerous. A banana slug’s color wards off predators and can vary from yellow to brownish, with some banana slugs even displaying spots. Their color can alter due to age, health, and environmental changes, such as light level and moisture. Banana slugs need abundant moisture in order to survive....
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Saturday Survival Skills Banana Slugs Bright colors often signal that an animal
Kristin Collins
Linda J Riley
Eric Simpson
When hiking in the old-growth forest, be aware of stormy conditions. High winds can knock down trees and send widowmakers careening from the canopy at such a velocity that they will pierce the forest floor and remain standing. You can view many widowmakers along our trails, some of these were limbs on a tree over 300 feet high.

Anytime you hike during or after storms, keep your eyes and ears...
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When hiking in the oldgrowth forest be aware of stormy conditions High
Rory McDonald
Linda Hamel-Palmer
Pamela Liberona Garnham
We are inviting local youth to be a part of this summer's YCC crew. Ten young men and women will be selected, and this might be the best summer job of your lives. #mondaymotivation

[ Nps.gov Link ]
We are inviting local youth to be a part of this summers
HOST Campers
Donald R Griffin
Saturday Survival Skills: Fallen Trees

When a tree falls in the forest... it contributes to the ecosystem in a whole new way! As it slowly decomposes it puts nutrients into the soil, it can be used as shelter for animals, it becomes a nurse log, and decomposers like fungi, banana slugs, and bacteria LOVE these downed trees. Fallen trees, like many from this winter, help keep old-growth...
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Saturday Survival Skills Fallen Trees When a tree falls in the forest
Peter Batt
Carol Ellis Sharek
Patrice Boquet
Have you ever stood INSIDE a living tree? Here's your chance to look 360 degrees all around an old-growth redwood...it has quite the story to tell. Many redwoods have "fire chimneys" like this. What do you notice?
NPS Photo: G Litten
Have you ever stood INSIDE a living tree Heres your chance to
Jeanne Green
Amy Jami Hiller
Kerri Koonlinger
Saturday Survival Skills: Snags

Standing dead trees, or snags, are trees that are no longer living but still attached to the root system. Snags vary in appearance; they can be short, tall, hollow, or without bark. Snags contribute to the health of our forests in many ways, such as by providing space for plants and animals. For example, bats love the dark hollow places that snags create, both...
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Saturday Survival Skills Snags Standing dead trees or snags are trees that
Dennis D Moncrief
Charles Foster
Linda Yao