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Dorie Miller was a steward aboard the USS West Virginia at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Like most African Americans in the Navy in 1941, Miller was not trained to fire Navy guns but likely received familiarization training on weapons. Miller shot down at least two Japanese aircraft during the attack, but did not survive the war.

A war hero, he became the first African American to be...
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Today in 1865, the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified, formally abolishing slavery in the United States,

The 13th Amendment to the Constitution declared that "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction."

Our...
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Slavery and Freedom

s.si.edu
In response to the arrest of Rosa Parks, Claudette Colvin and others for protesting Alabama's racial segregation laws, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began on this day in 1955.

Protestors joined carpools, took taxis and walked to show their support—the direct action helped spark the modern Civil Rights Movement. On December 20, 1956, a judge ruled that laws requiring segregated buses were...
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In the third and final workshop of our National History Day in 1-2-3 series of the 2017 contest year, we will get to the heart of a National History Day project: the thesis/argument.

A National History Day project should not be a list of facts, but rather an argument that can be supported by primary and secondary sources. This workshop will explore how to write and use an effective...
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On December 1st, 1955, Rosa Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama for refusing to give up her bus seat to a white male patron.
Her defiant act helped to ignite the Montgomery Bus Boycott, one of the first large-scale protests against segregation in the Deep South. Led by Martin Luther King Jr., the boycott started on the day of Parks’ court hearing and lasted 381 days. The United States...
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Here are four ways your #GivingTuesday gift will help the Museum educate and engage visitors and inspire our children and grandchildren to build a better world:

1. By celebrating the African American heroes and visionaries – from the first African American astronaut in space to the first African American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature – whose achievements have been forgotten, ignored,...
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We have finally realized our dream of a national museum devoted exclusively to celebrating African American history and culture. But now that the Museum is open to the public, we need continued support to make it a success.

On this #GivingTuesday, your gift will help the Museum educate and engage visitors and inspire our children and grandchildren to build a better world.

If you want to be...
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In African American communities in the late 19th century, Thanksgiving was celebrated in church with special Thanksgiving sermons.

The Rev. Benjamin Arnett was a prominent AME cleric in the Ohio AME Church. In his Centennial Thanksgiving sermon on November 30, 1876, Arnett reflects on the triumphs and failures of American history and projects a promising course for America's...
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Abby Fisher’s cookbook, "What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, Soups, Pickles, Preserves, Etc." was published in 1881 by the Women’s Cooperative Printing Office in San Francisco. Fisher was an award-winning cook who specialized in pickles, jellies and preserves.

She was born enslaved and couldn't read or write, so her recipes were carefully described to writers who compiled them...
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What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking

s.si.edu
In African American families, collard greens are often a staple at the Thanksgiving table.

“The collard greens were just one of a few select vegetables that African Americans were allowed to grow and harvest for themselves and their families throughout times of enslavement, and so over the years cooked greens developed into a traditional food,” according to the LATIBAH Collard Green Museum in...
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In 1921, one of the most devastating outbreaks of racial violence in American history occurred when a riot destroyed almost 40 blocks of a wealthy black neighborhood in Oklahoma. The story went largely untold for decades.

To this day, no one knows how many people died, and no one was ever convicted in the Tulsa Race Massacre. In a new episode of Sidedoor, the Smithsonian's recently launched...
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confronting the past | Sidedoor | Smithsonian

s.si.edu
Are you in the process of researching for your National History Day project? Would you like to learn how to find, identify, or analyze sources? Then join us on Saturday, November 19, 2016 for the second workshop in our NHD in 1 – 2 – 3 series: Identifying and Analyzing Sources. The workshop is FREE but registration is required.

This workshop is meant for student participants of National...
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#OTD in 1831, Nat Turner was hanged for planning a slave rebellion in Southampton County, Virginia.

It is thought that Nat Turner was holding this Bible when he was captured two months after the rebellion. Turner worked both as an enslaved field hand and as a minister. A man of remarkable intellect, he was widely respected by black and white people in Southampton County, Virginia. He used his...
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In choosing to serve in the military, African Americans sought to have their service understood by the nation as a demand for liberty and citizenship. African American men and women who engaged in the military made their service useful not only for the good of their country, but to benefit both their personal lives and their community.

Our "Double Victory: The African American Military...
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Meet Five African American Women Who Fought for Women's Suffrage: bit.ly/1MIRMVz #APeoplesJourney #Election2016

Five You Should Know: African American Suffragists

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NEW BLOG: "Power to the People: The Black Panther Party at 50"

"In October of 1966, college students Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense and drafted the Ten Point Platform and Program. The platform was designed so that the average working class Black person could understand. While its roots are in complex social and economic theory, the Black...
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Join on Sunday, October 30th at 3pm for "Power to the People: A Conversation with Stephen Shames & Bobby Seale."

Published on the 50th anniversary of the party’s founding, "Power to the People" is the in-depth chronicle of the impact and emergence of the Black Panther Party. Join esteemed photographer, Stephen Shames, and Black Panther founder, Bobby Seale in a discussion led by Hasan...
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