On April 29, 1992, Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and Officers Laurence M. Powell, Theodore J. Briseno, and Timothy E. Wind were acquitted of their assault and use of deadly force on Rodney King by a jury in Simi Valley.

Fires, looting, and violence spread in Los Angeles, leading to a state of emergency and the activation the National Guard. Over the next few days, crowds of residents face off against...
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On April 29 1992 Sgt Stacey C Koon and Officers Laurence M
Cat Gardere
Gayle Rockelli
Robert Mann-Thompson
The tumult of the 1992 Los Angeles riots and its causes involved African Americans and neighboring L.A. communities of color.

Join us live at 7 pm, as we host History, Rebellion, and Reconciliation: The L.A. Uprising 25 Years Later in collaboration with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center as we explore the different views these communities have on the L.A. riots.

Do you think riots...
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The tumult of the 1992 Los Angeles riots and its causes involved
Darlene Richardson
Robert Mann-Thompson
John Daye
The story of the L.A. Riots traces back to the great migration of African Americans to the West Coast. This year marks the 25th anniversary of the L.A. riots that erupted on April 29, 1992.

Our new blog explores the history of African Americans in Los Angeles and the conditions that led to the L.A. riots: bit.ly/2oJQXno

#LA92 #APeoplesJourney
The story of the LA Riots traces back to the great migration

American History Through an African American Lens - #LA92 Timeline: 25th Anniversary of the 1992 L.A....

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Linda Civitello
Robert Mann-Thompson
Roy Brinson
The story of the L.A. Riots traces back to the great migration of African Americans to the West Coast. This year marks the 25th anniversary of the L.A. riots that erupted April 29, 1992. Join us as we reflect on this historic moment.
Where were you when the ‘92 L.A. Riots took place? Share your reaction and your story below. Retrace the timeline here: bit.ly/2oJQXno
#LA92...
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Today marks the centennial celebration of Ella Fitzgerald! Often called the “First Lady of Song,” Ella Fitzgerald was born on this day in 1917. She got her big break while performing at Harlem’s Apollo Theater at the age of seventeen in 1934. Throughout her lifetime she was the recipient of many awards, including 13 Grammy Awards (one for lifetime achievement), and the Presidential Medal of...
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Today marks the centennial celebration of Ella Fitzgerald Often called the First
Malaika Abernathy Scriven
Kristy Miller
Cary Reza
Known for his “scat” singing and energetic stage presence, Cabell "Cab" Calloway III was a jazz singer and bandleader. He was a regular entertainer at the Cotton Club in Harlem during the 1930s. During that period, he led one of the most popular big bands, “Cab Calloway and his Orchestra,” featuring such performers as trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and saxophonists Ben Webster. History has it, that...
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Known for his scat singing and energetic stage presence Cabell Cab Calloway
Gwendolyn Glover
John Moore
Lee Bell
Nightclubs, theaters, and other performance venues were common gathering places in segregated African American neighborhoods. These were safe spaces for performers and audiences alike. African Americans in Atlantic City, New Jersey had their own haven in Club Harlem, located at 32 Kentucky Avenue in the city’s Northside. Club Harlem could seat 900 customers around two bandstands.

In the...
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Nightclubs theaters and other performance venues were common gathering places in
Diane Brand
Khalid Fields-Hayes
LaVerne Bowen
Mary Lou Williams is one of the only jazz musicians to adapt her style and play across multiple eras of the genre. She was an acclaimed and multi-talented pianist, composer, arranger, singer and educator. Williams performed nearly her entire life, beginning at the age of seven.

With more than 100 recordings to her credit, Williams wrote music for legendary bandleaders including Duke Ellington...
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Mary Lou Williams is one of the only jazz musicians to adapt
Gary Welsh
Jared Sawyers
Alex Brikoff
Jazz pianist and bandleader, William James “Count” Basie, is known for his big band that thrived during the Swing era. Basie moved his band from Missouri to New York City in 1936 to introduce “Kansas City Swing” to a national audience.

In 1958, Count Basie became the first African American man to receive a Grammy award. In the 60s and 70s, Basie collaborated with other musicians such as Ella...
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Alisa Wilkins Cortez
Andrea Gibson-Rivers
Linda Hill
Mentor to the great Duke Ellington and George Gershwin, Willie “The Lion” Smith was a musician’s musician. Born on November 25, 1897 in Newark, NJ to a musical family, Smith used the African American and Jewish music of his childhood to develop his own sound. After fighting World War 1, where his bravery with the famous Harlem Hellfighters earned him his nickname, Smith, along with James P....
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Mentor to the great Duke Ellington and George Gershwin Willie The Lion
Mmụta Na-azọndụ
Mentor to the great Duke Ellington and George Gershwin, Willie “The Lion” Smith was a musician’s musician. Born on November 25, 1897 in Newark, NJ to a musical family, Smith used the African American and Jewish music of his childhood to develop his own sound. After fighting World War 1, where his bravery with the famous Harlem Hellfighters earned him his nickname, Smith, along with James P....
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Obi Nwachuku
Lawrence Sylvester
Claire Park
Beginning in 1891, Smithsonian's National Zoo opened their doors the Monday after the Easter holiday to African American families. Known as Easter Monday, the tradition began as a pseudo-holiday for black domestic workers who had to work on Easter Sunday and were banned from attending the traditional White House Easter Egg Roll during segregation.

Today, the tradition has grown to include...
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Beginning in 1891 Smithsonians National Zoo opened their doors the Monday after
Sara J. Minor
Angel Love
Gayle Rockelli
Our museum’s highly symbolic presence on the National Mall is matched by the symbolism of the building itself. Lead designer David Adjaye and lead architect Philip Freelon, together with their architectural team Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup, synthesized a variety of distinctive elements from Africa and the Americas into the building’s design and structure.

Our oculus, placed at the north...
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Our museums highly symbolic presence on the National Mall is matched by
Bobby L Rodriguez
Clarice Hazel
Danielle Ray
Connie’s Inn was a famous Harlem night club founded by Connie Immerman and his brothers in 1923. Immigrant bootleggers, they leveraged their fortune to open Connie’s Inn at 2221 Seventh Avenue off of 131 street in New York City. Copying the segregation tactics of venues like the Cotton Club, African Americans were originally banned from enjoying the many Black performers that made Connie’s Inn...
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Connies Inn was a famous Harlem night club founded by Connie Immerman
Andrea VonBlog
#OnThisDay in 1964, Sidney Poitier became the first African American to be awarded the Oscar Academy Award for Best Actor for his role as jack-of-all-trades Homer Smith in the 1963 feature film Lilies of the Field.

Poitier was born on February 20, 1927 during his parent’s visit to Miami from the Bahamas. He returned to the United States as a teenager to enlist in the U.S. Army during World...
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Dina M. Bennett
Lauren Craig Redmond
Guzman-Russell Kathryn
Emily Hutchinson Meggett, 85, and her family, residents of Edisto Island, visited our Museum for the first time Thursday, April 10. Meggett is the wife of the deceased Jessie Meggett, who grew up in this former slave cabin in South Carolina. Prominently featured in the Slavery and Freedom exhibition in the Museum, the two-room wood cabin dates to the 1850s, and members of the Meggett family...
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Lisa Barmadia
Teona Boyd
Will Holland
#OnThis Date in 1861, with our nation split along regional lines, southern confederate troops bombarded Ft. Sumter, starting the Civil War.

For African Americans, the Civil War was a fight for freedom. Their actions changed the course of the nation, transforming a war to limit slavery into a war to abolish it. Most Americans did not share this goal. The North was committed to controlling the...
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OnThis Date in 1861 with our nation split along regional lines southern
Dee Toliver
Darryl O'Bryant
Harrison G. Moore IV
The Freedmen’s Bureau was established in 1865 to aid the formerly enslaved. The Bureau had offices in 15 states and Washington D.C. African Americans used the Freedman's Bureau to demand justice and find loved ones.

We need your help to transcribe the letters that formerly enslaved African American sent to Freedmen's Bureau so we can share their stories.

To learn more about the Freedmen's...
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The Freedmens Bureau was established in 1865 to aid the formerly enslaved
Lrita Zelman
Hollis Gentry
Anita D. Stokes
April 2017 marks the 25th anniversary of the Los Angeles riots and uprising – a historic moment triggered by the police beating of Rodney King, as well as longstanding racial tensions. The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center and the National Museum of African American History and Culture will remember this moment together with an evening event titled, "History, Rebellion and...
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April 2017 marks the 25th anniversary of the Los Angeles riots and

History, Rebellion & Reconciliation: The L.A. Uprising 25 Years

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At the center of Harlem’s theatrical district was the Lafayette Theatre. Built in 1912, the theatre stood in a class of its own as the first major theatre to cater to African American audiences. It desegregated as early as that year, allowing African American patrons to sit in orchestra seats in addition to balcony seats. The Lafayette was also one of the first to disrupt the long-established...
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At the center of Harlems theatrical district was the Lafayette Theatre Built
Alexis Perry
Karla Patrice Perry
Cora Taylor