Plankton are drifters. Most swim too, but are not strong enough to overcome the currents they are entrained in—especially one as strong and fast as the Gulf Stream, where this species is found. The spines of this sea butterfly (or sea snail), Diacria trispinosa, increase its surface area, which helps it sink more slowly when it’s not swimming. Spines also increase its total size and make it a...
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Plankton are drifters Most swim too but are not strong enough to
To test the toxicity of ancient, bitumen-coated water bottles, scientists turned to experimental archaeology.
To test the toxicity of ancient bitumencoated water bottles scientists turned to

Plastic Water Bottles Might Have Poisoned Ancient Californians

wired.com
Kirsten O'Brien
Mike Hamborg
Mark Clemente
Modern insect pollinators have been present during and since the age of dinosaurs. Approximately 48 million years ago, in the Green River Formation of Eastern Colorado, this crane fly, a member of the Family Tipulidae (crane flies) of the Insect order Diptera (true flies) was likely obtaining nectar from deep tubular flowers. The evidence for this association includes the elongate, probing...
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Modern insect pollinators have been present during and since the age of
Paul Jodka
Jack Felsher
Donna Lee Coutchavlis-Wong
Planktonic organisms have evolved sophisticated behaviors for living up in the water column. In this realm, there is nothing but other animals to cling to, so life is spent drifting, swimming, and sinking. Phronima (pictured here) is a group of hyperiid amphipod crustaceans that specializes in capturing gelatinous creatures known as salps (not pictured). They strip the salp of its living...
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Planktonic organisms have evolved sophisticated behaviors for living up in the water
He was a natural history icon whose untimely death was shrouded in mystery for more than 130 years. Listen to the story of explorer Robert Kennicott (1835-1866), on the latest episode of Sidedoor, the Smithsonian's podcast.
He was a natural history icon whose untimely death was shrouded in

Sidedoor: ep. 1 | if these bones could talk| Smithsonian Institution

si.edu
Planktonic snails like this one, a thecosome or shelled pteropod, build transparent shells for protection from predators and structure for their soft bodies. The shells of these mollusks are extremely thin and reach a maximum size of about a half an inch. However, building this home is no easy task. The shells of Cuvierina columnella grow in two phases: first, the shell grows to its maximum...
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Planktonic snails like this one a thecosome or shelled pteropod build transparent
Must-see TV, tonight on PBS: Great Yellowstone Thaw, hosted by our very own Kirk Johnson! #YellowstonePBS Find out more at: [ Pbs.org Link ]
Mustsee TV tonight on PBS Great Yellowstone Thaw hosted by our very
Susan Westin
Gardeners, use the power of your green thumb to help out the pollinators. Plant (and register) your pollinator garden today! #PollinatorWeek
Gardeners use the power of your green thumb to help out the

Home - Million Pollinator Garden Challenge

millionpollinatorgardens.org
Keith Owen
Linda Warren
Sharon Rae
So many midwater animals sport extremely large eyes, you might think they inspired the designers of Beanie Boos. Compound eyes—found in insects and crustaceans, like Platyscelus, a hyperiid amphipod—consist of numerous lenses instead of just one. Each lens focuses incoming light on the photon-sensitive cells at the base of the eye, the retina. The retina then sends the information gathered...
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So many midwater animals sport extremely large eyes you might think they
Rigel Dyess-Hall
In the open ocean, there is nothing to hide behind or within. As a result, animals living there have evolved numerous adaptations to hide in plain sight. This can make communication between individuals challenging, especially when visual signals are a primary form of communication. Animals want to get a message as far as possible to potential mates, but don’t want to attract predators in the...
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In the open ocean there is nothing to hide behind or within
Leptocotis, a planktonic crustacean, has a transparent body with a narrow head. Its two eyes form a cylinder allowing it to see in a 360-degree field of view. This is likely a visual adaptation to life in the midwater—all the water below the ocean’s surface and above the seafloor, the largest habitat on Earth. In the midwater, predators and prey can be anywhere, so a wider field of vision is...
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Leptocotis a planktonic crustacean has a transparent body with a narrow head
Roberta Szymanowski
Coby Trapp
Sometimes all an anthropologist needs is a good ornithologist. Fortunately we have both at the Smithsonian.
Sometimes all an anthropologist needs is a good ornithologist Fortunately we have

Telling the Story of 19th-Century Native American Treasures Through Bird Feathers

smithsonianmag.com
Nancy Klein
What looks like one other-worldly organism is actually two. The little popcorn-shaped blobs above are the #jellyfish Pandea rubra, which lives in the ocean’s midwater. At this stage of its lifecycle, it needs to attach to something, enter: the sea butterfly, Clio recurva. With its transparent, triangular shell this swimming snail has minimal protection, so wearing a stinging jellyfish...
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What looks like one otherworldly organism is actually two The little popcornshaped
And you thought your office “trust fall” was difficult. This film from our archives shows what trust really looks like. We’re sharing it because we're a little excited about the Smithsonian Folklife's focus on the #CircusArts this year. The Folklife Festival runs from June 29 through July 9.
And you thought your office trust fall was difficult This film from

Japanese acrobats ca. 1920

Silent black & white archival film clip from "Japan: Promotional and Theatrical Footage, ca. 1927". The full film, which is 17 minutes long, includes segment...

YOUTUBE.COM
It’s wedding season! For all the betrothed who are looking for a little style inspiration, we offer a selection from our National Gem Collection. These pieces were donated to the Smithsonian by cereal heiress Mrs. Marjorie Merriweather Post. They are now on view through Jan 1, 2018 at the Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens.
Its wedding season For all the betrothed who are looking for a
Sharon Flax Waddington
Terri Buhrow
Constance Anderson
Looking for some good beach reads? Smithsonian marine biologist Nancy Knowlton has a few #EarthOptimism suggestions.
Looking for some good beach reads Smithsonian marine biologist Nancy Knowlton has

Seven Books Worth Reading to Change the Conversation About Climate Change

smithsonianmag.com
Alexandra Gottlieb
Julian Holman
Danielle Vingelis
If you're in DC this Wednesday evening, join us for this special preview of the new PBS series "Great Yellowstone Thaw."
If youre in DC this Wednesday evening join us for this special

Great Yellowstone Thaw, Excerpt Screening (Free)

EVENT - facebook.com
Our Arctic Studies Center friends recently shared this treasure from the Smithsonian's circumpolar ethnology collections: snow-goggles made from wolverine. These shades were collected in 1869 from Canada’s Northwest Territories.

Whether you’re on the beach in Florida, or hiking through the Arctic, we hope you are protecting your eyes from the sun (and looking fashionable).

[UPDATE: Our...
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Our Arctic Studies Center friends recently shared this treasure from the Smithsonians
Alexandre Paiement
Macon County NC Historical Museum
Lorraine Beall