Inka khipu—knotted strings used for record-keeping (khipu means knot or knots) helped the Inka Empire rule its vast domain for more than 100 years. The khipu has one horizontal string from which hang numerous other strings (85, on average) that vary in length, knots, twine technology, and color—different attributes that served to record tax rolls, grain storage, labor input from particular...
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Inka khipuknotted strings used for recordkeeping khipu means knot or knots helped
Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian
Renée Bussell
Barbara R Gross
NEW on the museum's blog: When the imagiNATIONS Activity Center opens at the museum in New York City next year, grass cable used to build the Q'eswachaka Bridge on the Inka Road and a length of steel suspender rope from the Bayonne Bridge will illustrate shared engineering principles.

Story reprinted with permission from Portfolio, the official blog of the Port Authority of New York and New...
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NEW on the museums blog When the imagiNATIONS Activity Center opens at

Bayonne Bridge Steel Rope, Making History in Lower Manhattan

blog.nmai.si.edu
Charlotte Edith Anderson Monture (Six Nations of the Grand River, 1890–1996) was the first Native Canadian registered nurse. Rejected from Canadian nursing schools because of her Native heritage, she studied in the United States. In 1917, she volunteered for the U.S. Medical Corps and served in a hospital in France. After the war, Charlotte returned to the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario to...
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Charlotte Edith Anderson Monture Six Nations of the Grand River 18901996 was
Yann Castelnot
Yann Castelnot
Kathy Flayter Sorensen
For the first day of summer, a ceremonial fan with beadwork of the rising sun:

“The handle of this fan holds a star, likely the Morning Star, trailing the beadwork Sun as it rises against a yellow background. Tail feathers of a golden eagle evoke that bird’s role as a messenger to the Creator. Fans similar to this are used in ceremonies of the native American Church. Such fans transfer the...
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For the first day of summer a ceremonial fan with beadwork of the rising sun:
Barbara Braveboy Locklear
Elaine Wilson
Kathey Pool
Thank you to The Museum Mama for this terrific write-up of a visit to the museum in Washington, D.C. We're very happy to know you and your family had such a good experience at the imagiNATIONS Activity Center, but even more than that, we appreciate the unusually thoughtful and thorough review. Please come again soon—for the Living Earth Festival July 14, 15 & 16, if not before: [ Nmai.si.edu...
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Thank you to The Museum Mama for this terrific writeup of a
The Museum Mama
This year's summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere begins at 12:24 a.m. Wednesday, June 21, will be the longest day of the year, as the sun reaches its highest point and traces its longest arc in the sky. In the museum in Washington, beginning at about 10 a.m., three spectrums cast by the summer prisms in museum's prism window will move north across the floor of the Potomac Atrium. One...
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This years summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere begins at 1224 am
Evelyn Thomas
Colleen Jollie
Florence Maggard
Soul sensation Martha Redbone is performing at our museum in New York tonight to mark the 4th Annual Night At The Museums across Lower Manhattan. Tonight offers special programming and free admission to 15 downtown cultural institutions from 4 to 8 p.m. Stop by the museum to hear Martha perform again on the hour at 5, 6 and 7 p.m. #NightAtTheMuseums #NATM2017
Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian
EM Binah-Atarah
Julia Meredith
One of the many great things about New York is the generous support for the arts provided by government, businesses, foundations, and people. If you're near Lower Manhattan this afternoon, we hope you'll take part in Night at the Museums and, especially, catch Martha Redbone performing at the National Museum of the American Indian a 4, 5, 6 & 7 p.m. The museum is offering extra exhibition and...
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One of the many great things about New York is the generous

Martha Redbone at Night at the Museums

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New Yorkers: TOMORROW at 4, 5, 6 & 7 p.m. in the NY museum's 2nd-floor Rotunda, neo-soul music sensation Martha Redbone performs live. Described by critic Robert Christgau as "a major find,” Redbone possesses a rich vocal talent informed by her mixed Cherokee, Choctaw, European, and African American heritage, producing a sultry, powerful sound that is unmistakably her own.

Ms. Redbone's...
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New Yorkers TOMORROW at 4 5 6 7 pm in the NY
Solomon Koi'LishTa Sarah
Laura Ortman
"Corn is the most sacred food" in the Inka world, says museum archaeologist and ethnologist Ramiro Matos (Quechua), co-curator of the exhibition "The Great Inka Road." Andean peoples saw corn—cultivated in dozens of varieties—as critical to their survival, according to Dr. Matos, and included Saramama, the maize mother, among their gods. So perhaps it's not surprising that corn is the food...
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Corn is the most sacred food in the Inka world says museum
Veronica Solis
Diana Howell
Matthew Hahn
New Yorkers: TODAY from 3 to 4:15 p.m. at the museum in Lower Manhattan, choreographer & dancer Netta Yerushalmy presents Paramodernities #2 & #3, tributes to Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey. Commissioned by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and part of River 2 River 2017, Paramodernities brings together live presentations by scholars and performances by a diverse cast of dancers, plus public...
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New Yorkers TODAY from 3 to 415 pm at the museum in

Paramodernities #2 and #3 - Lower Manhattan Cultural Council

lmcc.net
Happy Father's Day! Whether you're thinking about your parents and grandparents today, other father figures in your life, or Father Sky, we hope you have a wonderful day.

Photo: Cochiti Pueblo family having lunch outdoors under a shade tree, ca. 1950. From left to right: Anita Suina, Jose Ray Suina, Ernest Suina, Mary Helen Suina, Hoo-di-ats Trujillo, Andrew Trujillo (Ashona), and Tommie...
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Happy Fathers Day Whether youre thinking about your parents and grandparents today
Today's U.S. Google Doodle honors Dr. Susan La Flesche (Omaha, 1865–1915), the first western-trained Native American physician. After studying at the Hampton Institute in Virginia, Susan La Flesche attended the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, supported by a scholarship from the Women's National Indian Association. In 1889 she graduated first in her class and returned to the Omaha...
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Todays US Google Doodle honors Dr Susan La Flesche Omaha 18651915 the
Karen Hill
LIVE webcast ~ 1pm (starting soon), Andean music and dance with Tradiciones Bolivianas and Inca Wayra from Celebrating the Inka Road. nmai.si.edu/webcasts

Live Webcasts | National Museum of the American Indian

nmai.si.edu
TODAY & tomorrow, Saturday & Sunday June 17 & 18, at the museum in Washington, we're Celebrating the Inka Road. Enjoy a weekend of Andean music and dance with Tradiciones Bolivianas and Inca Wayra. Explore other Inka Road–related activities, including a “pop-up planetarium” showing the unique Inka constellations and a demonstration in how to "dress a llama."

LIVE WEBCASTS! Can't be at the...
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TODAY tomorrow Saturday Sunday June 17 18 at the museum in Washington
Christine Pardo
Dowanahdinape Tanner Sager-Littleghost
Renée Bussell
NEW on the museum's blog: A young colleague writes on last week's Makers + Mentors program at the museum in New York. She shares the ambitions and excitement of other students who took part in the event, as well as the generosity and determination of the fashion artists there to teach and encourage them.

[ S.si.edu Link ]

Photos: Multidisciplinary artist and filmmaker Courtney M. Leonard...
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NEW on the museums blog A young colleague writes on last weeks
Dr. David J. Skorton, 13th secretary of the Smithsonian, and Karen Keller, director of Special Events and Protocol at the Smithsonian Institution, visited the National Museum of the American Indian's Cultural Resources Center yesterday to view pottery scheduled for loan to the Poeh Cultural Center at the Pueblo of Pojaque in New Mexico. Pottery from the Pueblos of Tesuque, Pojoaque, San...
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Dr David J Skorton 13th secretary of the Smithsonian and Karen Keller
Kate Blair
Tiffany Chavis
Gerald Lomaventema
Till 7:30 this evening, the museum in New York is hosting Textile Memories, a drop-in workshop for artists and artists-to-be ages 9 and up. Sadly, most of us won't make it to the museum tonight, so here are some of the creative cues people are using to make small textile collages, inspired by designer Patricia Michaels (Taos Pueblo) and her "Parasols" installation in "Native Fashion Now":

▪︎...
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Till 730 this evening the museum in New York is hosting Textile
Today is Flag Day, officially established in 1916 to commemorate June 14, 1777, when the Second Continental Congress adopted the flag of the United States.

Jenny Ann Chapoose Taylor (Uintah Ute) used more than 130,000 glass seed beads to make this American flag, "Nations," which became for her a mourning tribute to 9/11. In red-on-red and white-on-white beads, she worked the names of 456...
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Today is Flag Day officially established in 1916 to commemorate June 14
Shirl Eteeyan
Barbara R Gross
Rachel Conrod
Join us for the eighth annual Living Earth Festival celebrating the bounty and wisdom of the Earth. The festival will feature daily cooking presentations highlighting cacao as the featured ingredient, artist demonstrators, and dance performances by the Southern Ute Bear Dancers from Ignacio, CO, Artists taking part this year include Mi’kmaq bead and textile artist Karen Hodge Russell,...
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Join us for the eighth annual Living Earth Festival celebrating the bounty

Living Earth Festival

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