The Field Museum
02/23/2017 at 14:57. Facebook
What goes into creating multimedia pieces for a museum gallery? In our exhibition, Drawing on Tradition: Kanza Artist Chris Pappan, the Museum collaborated with Chris Pappan, Adam Sings In The Timber, Debrah Yepa-Pappan and Santiago X to create the immersive experience that brings the exhibition to life.

Chris shared his thoughts about putting together the audio and video for the show on our...
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The Field Museum
yesterday at 14:58. Facebook
This specimen, Orthospirifer milwaukeensis, was collected from the old Milwaukee Cement Company quarries in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Orthospirifer milwaukeensis lived 380 million years old ago during the Middle Devonian on the seafloor of an ancient sea that once covered much of the Midwest. The sediments deposited by this ancient sea formed a shaly dolostone rock now called the Milwaukee...
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The Field Museum
02/21/2017 at 14:57. Facebook
Things are moving at The Field Museum! Bruce Patterson, MacArthur Curator of Mammals, showed off the left fore foot of an Asian elephant that's about to go on display in our upcoming exhibition, Specimens: Unlocking the Secrets of Life.

For scale, large Asian elephants weigh 5,400 kg and are 3.20 m at the shoulder. Females reach 2.54 m at the shoulder and weigh 4,160 kg. The Asian elephant...
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The Field Museum
02/20/2017 at 14:58. Facebook
The Field Museum
02/19/2017 at 15:05. Facebook
What do we mean when we talk about facts in science? Take a look at how scientists at The Field Museum (and around the world) learn about the world around us:

www.fieldmuseum.org

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The Field Museum
02/18/2017 at 15:00. Facebook
Like fitting together the pieces of a puzzle, artistic reconstructions of extinct animals, plants, and ancient landscapes help us picture life on Earth millions of years ago:

Picturing the Past Through Scientific Illustration

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The Field Museum
02/17/2017 at 15:00. Facebook
Did you know that octopuses have three hearts? Or that more time has passed between T. rex and Stegosaurus than T. rex and humans? Here at The Field Museum, scientists are constantly striving to make new discoveries and gain a better understanding of life, nature, and the world around us.

As part of the #DayOfFacts, we asked some of our science communicators and experts to take us through...
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The Field Museum
02/16/2017 at 15:04. Facebook
Today’s specimens (P 11689) are 330 million year old Mississippian seashells. They are spirifer brachiopods (Spirifer keokuk) from Marion County, Iowa. All of these specimens came form the same location and the same layer of rock and have been identified as the same species. In the photo below, we can see 63 spirifer brachiopods, which were housed with an additional 312 specimens. There are...
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From land-dwelling ancestors, the first whales evolved for life spent on partly on land, partly in the sea. With webbed feet, they could swim; with long limbs, they could move about on shore.

But food was abundant in the seas. Within ten million years, whales were fully aquatic. Webbed front feet evolved into paddle-like filppers. Hind limbs all but disappeared, as a broad tail fluke evolved...
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Fresh roses, romantic dinners, and chocolates in heart shaped boxes. Valentine's day has arrived. While we may feel as though these traditions have been around for ages, traditions change; old ways are forgotten, replaced by new ones more reflective of the times.

Although it is seldom used today, the great Sioux Nation (Lakota, Dakota and Nakota peoples) have a long-standing tradition of...
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Romance and plants?

The Rare Book Room in our library contains a set of engraved plates from “Temple of Flora” by Robert Thornton. Published in 1807, this volume was the third part in Thornton’s series “New illustration of the sexual system of Carolus von Linnaeus.” It includes rich illustrations of flowers in grand settings and describes the “Sexual System” of plant taxonomy that Linnaeus...
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For #ValentinesDay, we're live with birds experts Shannon Hackett and Chad Eliason talking about bird attraction! Ask them your questions about birds, feathers, and courtship in the comments below.
Scientists know all about the birds and bees, but what about the mating habits of animals that went extinct millions of years ago—dinosaurs?

While it’s hard to know exactly what happened, we’re confident that roses and cards weren’t involved. Here’s what we do we know about dinosaur attraction: [ Fieldmuseum.org Link ]

#ValentinesDay
Today is Charles Darwin’s birthday! To celebrate, check out some of the coolest things we have in our collections with a link to the Granddaddy of Biology himself. #DarwinDay

The Field Museum

fieldmuseum.org
These objects represent unity and harmony in marriage: a mirror with the character for “double happiness” and a sculpture of two ducks, mates for life. In the Tang Dynasty (AD 618–906), a pair of ducks became a popular symbol of faithfulness and harmony between a husband and wife. This bronze sculpture may have been given as a wedding gift. Objects for a couple’s household, such as dishes or...
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Bird feathers can be like an understated down coat or enable an engineering feat like flight, but on Valentine’s Day, we thought we’d showcase how feathers make the bird. Feathers are a bird’s finery.

Join us live February 14 at 10:30 am CST to see birds from The Field Museum’s collections and talk to us about birds, their displays, and their feathers.

Share your questions now, or bring...
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These ancient seashells are evidence that a warm, tropical sea once covered Indiana. The seashells are rhynchonellid brachiopods (Camarotoechia whitei) that lived 430 million years old on the Waldron Shale of Indiana. These fossils were on display during the World Columbian Exposition of 1893, in the Geology Hall of The Field Museum’s original building (where the Museum of Science and Industry...
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This intricately carved wooden screen has been a fixture in our library's Reading Room for many years. A visiting researcher helped us rediscover its fascinating origins: [ Fieldmuseum.org Link ]

#LibraryLoversMonth
Live with Dr. Philipp Heck talking about meteorites and the "fireball" over Lake Michigan.

Send us your questions in the comments below!
Did you catch the meteor that lit up the sky around 1:27am on Monday morning? We're going live with Dr. Philipp Heck, Robert A. Pritzker Associate Curator of Meteoritics and Polar Studies, at 1:00pm CST to talk about how meteorites come to Earth and more about the fireball that fell into Lake Michigan early morning morning.

Share your questions below, or join us at 1:00pm CST this afternoon!...
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Meteor Lights Up Skies Above Chicago, Midwest

chicagotonight.wttw.com