“Elliott Green’s paintings appear to be in continuous motion,” writes Jana Prikryl, “the way animals, plants, and ultimately rocks and mountains are in continuous motion, even when our human vision fails to apprehend it.”

The Painter of Continuous Motion

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For a view of what’s wrong with urban development today, look no further than the rebuilding of the World Trade Center.

New York’s Vast Flop

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Salamishah Tillet on Jules Allen's 'Marching Bands,' a "stunning collection of social documentary, portraiture, and panoramic photography that takes us into the behind-the-scenes world of African-American marching bands all over the country."

The Thrill of the Black Marching Band

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"Imagine leaving behind a life to which you cannot claim allegiance or affection," writes Chris Ware of George Herriman, the creator of the 'Krazy Kat' comic strip.

To Walk in Beauty

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What caused the sudden burst of outbreaks of the measles in the US? Vaccine refusal. President Trump’s support for the anti-vaccination position "threatens to pry open and expand these pockets of resistance, sowing widespread doubt about the credibility of scientific fact," writes Daniel Smith.

Trump’s Threat to Public Health

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Elizabeth Drew on the first weeks of the Trump administration

Terrifying Trump

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El Salvador is the most violent peacetime country in the world. Madeleine Schwartz reports on a town that claims to have defied this trend.

El Salvador: A Town Without Violence?

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Garry Wills: "Milton wrote that Samson, whose strength was in his hair, considered it a God-given 'hallowed pledge / Of all my strength'—what he called 'my precious fleece.'"

The Emperor’s Hairdo

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Robert Darnton writes, "The equivalent of today’s poisonous, bite-size texts and tweets can be found in most periods of history, going back to the ancients."

The True History of Fake News

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“When he gets in front of any crowd, he will say whatever he thinks will make an impact at that very moment,” James Fenton writes of Rodrigo Duterte, president of the Philippines, who has compared himself to Hitler and admitted abusing synthetic opioids. He has also presided over a wave of thousands of extrajudicial killings and threatened to declare martial law.

Duterte’s Last Hurrah: On the Road to Martial Law

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Jackson Lears reviews Stephen Kinzer’s ‘The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire,’ which “captures the tragic impact of American hubris at home and abroad.”

How the US Began Its Empire

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"President Trump’s ban on refugees is clearly racist and probably unconstitutional but it’s also just plain stupid, at least if the goal is to build a strong, safe, working nation," write Sue Halpern and Bill McKibben.

The Americans We Need

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Intended to rejuvenate public sculpture in Britain, in 1972 the City Sculpture Project gave sixteen artists £1000 each to produce a site-specific sculpture.

"The main responses seem to have been indifference and barely concealed philistinism," writes Jon Day in his review of an exhibition documenting the project, now in its final week at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds.

The Problem of Public Sculpture

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"Even at its most urgent, Paul Nash’s painting seems tremulous, poised between past and future, dream and reality," writes Jenny Uglow of the exhibit now at the Tate Britain.

A Painter of the Shattered World

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"Between the lines of Asghar Farhadi's 'The Salesman' is a malignant subtext about Iranian society, which, despite the uneven entry of egalitarian values, remains wedded to old-fashioned honor codes," writes Christopher de Bellaigue.

Iran: A Private Agony

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David Cole: "Given that Trump's travel ban directly violates the Constitution, it may seem unsurprising that so many courts have weighed in against it. But such immediate and widespread pushback from the judicial branch is extraordinary."

Trump in Court

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Robert Worth on an exhibit showcasing a vast collection of early Korans from Herat to Istanbul, now at the Smithsonian's Freer and Sackler Galleries

Crafting the Koran

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"Our accelerating disappearance into the digital ether now defines us—we are the mediated people, whose contact with one another and the world around us is now mostly veiled by a screen," writes Bill McKibben. "There may, however, be islands in that digital whitewater, spots where we could haul ourselves out of the rapids and rest, remembering what it was like Before."

Pause! We Can Go Back!

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"Everything about the present moment feels different than protests of the past," writes Michael Greenberg. "The opposition to Trump’s policies from a broad range of present and former elected officials has been immediate and appears to be spurred on by, and in visceral agreement with, protesters on the street."

The New Resistance

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The two names most often cited in Academy Awards thank-you speeches are Steven Spielberg and God, with Spielberg leading God by a considerable margin.

Spielberg: The Inner Lives of a Genius

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