Max Nelson on Stan Brakhage: "What his films shared was an obsession with light—the patterns it makes, its effects on the eye and the brain, how different shooting methods and editing strategies could make it behave."
Max Nelson on Stan Brakhage What his films shared was an obsession

Brakhage: When Light Meets Life

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Martin Filler on the "quietly brilliant" architectural transformation of Times Square
Martin Filler on the "quietly brilliant" architectural transformation of Times Square

Times Square Reborn

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Ingrid Rowland: "The Florentine exhibition 'Bill Viola: Electronic Renaissance,' organized around the work of the acclaimed American video artist Bill Viola, has brought the paragone—the age-old debate about the most expressive form of art—into the twenty-first century."
Ingrid Rowland The Florentine exhibition Bill Viola Electronic Renaissance organ

Facing Off with the Old Masters

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Alison Bennetts
Laura Poitras filmed Julian Assange for six years to make her new film Risk, which follows the WikiLeaks founder as he goes from, in Sue Halpern’s words, “a bit player on the international stage to one of its dramatic leads.”
Laura Poitras filmed Julian Assange for six years to make her new

The Nihilism of Julian Assange

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Dom Murray
Víctor Cremer
Timothy John Tiedemann
"Matisse, unsurprisingly, had strong feelings about the objects of his daily life. They delighted, inspired, or confounded him, in their humble ordinariness and in all that they evoked," writes Claire Messud in her review of "Matisse in the Studio," which presents Matisse's favorite objects alongside the works that draw upon them, now at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Matisse unsurprisingly had strong feelings about the objects of his daily life

Matisse: The Joy of Things

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Marcia Angell reviews two new books that tell the story of the battles over Roe v. Wade throughout the years. Angell writes, "The 1980 Republican platform called for a constitutional amendment to protect the life of the unborn, and the new president, Ronald Reagan, who, like Trump, had once favored abortion, now, like Trump, opposed it."
Marcia Angell reviews two new books that tell the story of the

The Abortion Battlefield

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"There are no nasty questions in 'The Putin Interviews,' Oliver Stone's new four-part documentary series," writes Robert Cottrell.
There are no nasty questions in The Putin Interviews Oliver Stones new

The Banality of Putin

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Igor Fabbri
Raff Incandenza
Sammy Ackerberg
Judge Jed S. Rakoff on how he changed his mind about the death penalty: "Unless one acknowledges that rational human beings can feel such revulsion at the taking of an innocent life as to wish the taker dead, one misses part of the reason that the death penalty continues to enjoy significant popular support."
Judge Jed S Rakoff on how he changed his mind about the

Will the Death Penalty Ever Die?

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Michael McKellar
Jason James Bickford
Fintan O’Toole writes, "I am not sure whether the National Rifle Association has ever thought of having an official Nobel literary laureate. But if it did there is no doubt that it would choose Ernest Hemingway."
Fintan OToole writes I am not sure whether the National Rifle Association

The Male Impersonator

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Jerome Groopman and Pamela Hartzband on our sick health care system, and how to fix it
Jerome Groopman and Pamela Hartzband on our sick health care system and how to fix it

Putting Profits Ahead of Patients

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Gene Poole
Erin Sinclair
Frank Mowbray
"No matter how many troops the US decides to send to Afghanistan this summer, it will not rectify the political crisis in Kabul," writes Ahmed Rashid.
No matter how many troops the US decides to send to Afghanistan

Afghanistan: It’s Too Late

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Christopher Caster
Rex Michael Dillon
David Wightman
"For any materialist vision of consciousness, the crucial stumbling block is the question of free will," writes Tim Parks, introducing his most recent dialogue with Riccardo Manzotti on consciousness.
For any materialist vision of consciousness the crucial stumbling block is the

Consciousness: Who’s at the Wheel?

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Tom Southall
Gary Schultz
Janet S Miller
David Grossman has been awarded this year’s Man Booker International Prize for his novel A Horse Walks into a Bar, about an aging Israeli stand-up comedian. In his review, Stephen Greenblatt called the book “unbearably bleak,” and writes that it enters into a “Kafka-zone where tragedy and comedy are braided together.”
David Grossman has been awarded this years Man Booker International Prize for

The King of the Bitter Laugh

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Roger Roney
Bobby Bell
Susan Gruen Frankel
Sarah Kerr on the feminist backstory of Wonder Woman: “Hiding in her kitschy story lines and scant costume were allusions to and visual tropes from old struggles for women’s freedom, and an occasional framing of battles like the right to a living wage and basic equality that have yet to be decisively won.”
Sarah Kerr on the feminist backstory of Wonder Woman Hiding in her

Wonder Woman: The Weird, True Story

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Dave Ricucci
Tom Southall
Adam Levin
An account of the 1761-1767 Danish expedition to Arabia was first published in English in 1964 as 'Felix Arabia.' And "it was only then," writes Colin Thubron in his introduction to a new edition, just published by NYRB Classics, "that the full drama and strangeness of the expedition was widely revealed."
An account of the 17611767 Danish expedition to Arabia was first published

Lost in Arabia

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Elsebeth Merkly
Paul Naisbitt
Kelly Brest van Kempen
"Recent events in Egypt have raised the question of whether the tradeoff General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi has offered the Egyptian public—keeping them safe in exchange for an authoritarian state and far-reaching restrictions on civil society—is working," writes Joshua Hammer.
Recent events in Egypt have raised the question of whether the tradeoff

Egypt: The New Dictatorship

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James Guida surveys Portuguese writer José Maria de Eça de Queirós's fiction, on the occasion of a new translation of 'The Illustrious House of Ramires'
James Guida surveys Portuguese writer José Maria de Eça de Queiróss fiction

The Proust of Portugal

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Mike Joyce
Giselle Macedo
Carlos Augusto Góes
"The new face of Russian protest is barely pubescent," writes Masha Gessen. "As long as some Russians, including some very young ones, are willing—as they were on Monday—to brave streets filled with riot police, they keep an unreasonable hope alive."
The new face of Russian protest is barely pubescent writes Masha Gessen

The New Face of Russian Resistance

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Arhi Kuittinen
Ayaka Kagari
Ekaterina Romanovna
Our colleagues Daniel Drake and Allison Hughes have launched a new venture offering a wide range of editorial services for writers. See the link below for more information.
Our colleagues Daniel Drake and Allison Hughes have launched a new venture

Drake & Hughes Editorial

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Bonnie Kuhn
Francine Prose on the importance of language in former FBI Director James Comey's recent testimony: "Comey's hearing proved that it is still possible for politicians to speak in complete sentences, to display a familiarity with history, to strive for linguistic and moral clarity: to make sense."
Francine Prose on the importance of language in former FBI Director James

Words Still Matter

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Raff Incandenza
Petr Salidar
Rustie Brooke