UNICEF Australia
03/24/2017 at 02:19. Facebook
“Five years. That’s how long I‘ve been here. We came here to work as the situation was becoming really bad in Syria. I was never enrolled in school back home, so I’ve never learnt how to read. Once we got here I didn‘t go either as I needed to help my mother and look after my siblings. I pick potatoes in the field under the sun because we need all the money we can get. I imagine a school to be...
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We found 12-year-old Mohammad caring for his entire family in the worst conditions imaginable. They had one request: to stay together.

How Aleppo's orphans find a place to call home

unicef.org.au
"School is like a weapon." - Mariam, 11, Syrian refugee in Lebanon.
"I don't know how to read or write. I only know how to draw the sky, the sea and the sun." - Fares, 6, Syrian refugee in Lebanon.
The rubble of war in Aleppo won't stop Mahmoud from getting to school. "It's far but we go to achieve our dreams."
These refugee boys are your new friendship goals.
“My wish for Syria’s future is that it goes back to the way it was. No more war. I hope that we can go out and know that we will come back safely, not go out and never return home. To live like we used to. My message to the children of the world is to continue their education. Without education we cannot reach our dreams and secure peace." - Saja, 13, Aleppo.
“I love playing football. When I play football, I don’t feel like I’ve lost anything at all. Since the beginning of the war, my life has changed. We left our home. We were displaced more than five times. My biggest fear is when I am alone remembering my injury and my brother’s death. I feel sad and scared. I find some difficulties but not a lot. Nothing will stand in my way. There are only...
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This Syrian girl was born blind and forced from her home. Now she's singing out a powerful message to the world.
Seven tips to help children cope with distressing news

How to talk to your kids about the Syria crisis

unicef.org.au
Today marks a terrible milestone for the children of Syria: six years caught in a brutal war. We have witnessed their struggle unfold on our screens night after night. Seen children bombed while they sleep, fleeing for their lives and growing up in harsh refugee camps. But the children of Syria have not given up. They fight to survive every day, they cross battle lines to go to school and they...
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This Syrian girl lost her leg, her friends and her childhood. Now she's moving forward and kicking goals - literally.
We've seen six years of suffering but here's some good news.

Four reasons to have hope for Syria

unicef.org.au
“[My friend] was in a garden. He found a bomb and played with it like a football. It suddenly exploded. He lost his arms and legs.” Intense violence has left the Syrian city of Aleppo littered with unexploded weapons and taken a tragic toll on children like Abdulkarim and his friend. We can’t reverse his story but there’s still time to protect other children at risk. Since November, UNICEF and...
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Ahmed is living proof that, together, we can change the news for Syrian children. You might have seen the dreadful images on TV as thousands of children escaped from violence in Aleppo. That’s when UNICEF found this 10-year-old in desperate need on the outskirts of the city. Desperate for warmth. Desperate to survive the winter. Desperate to know someone still cared. UNICEF was there with...
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We've seen six years of horror headlines from Syria but here's proof we can change the news.

How we flipped four headlines for Syrian children

unicef.org.au
We've seen six years of horror headlines from Syria but here's proof we can change the news.

How we flipped four headlines for Syrian children

unicef.org.au
Beneath this war zone, dozens of children are giggling on a ferris wheel and lining up for fairy floss. Don't miss these magical photos.

This underground theme park in Syria is utterly surreal

unicef.org.au
Some of Australia's best chefs have come together to #CookforSyria. Stunning dinners in Sydney and Melbourne raised over $65,000 to support UNICEF's life-changing work for Syrian children.
Livey's journey from outcast teen mother to community leader makes it crystal clear: women can do anything. #IWD2017

At 17, Livey’s village wanted her dead. By 26, she was their mayor.

unicef.org.au