On February 26, 1943, the first transport of Roma (Gypsies) from the Reich arrived at Auschwitz-Birkenau. The SS housed them in Section B-IIe of the camp, which becomes known as the "Gypsy family camp." Conditions in the family camp contributed to the spread of infectious disease and epidemics—typhus, smallpox, and dysentery—which severely reduced the camp population. By the end of 1943, more...
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Join us and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the Museum on March 28 at 7 PM EDT as the Museum directors discuss the power of memory as well as the impact and the design of the Museum’s living memorials.

For more information on this event, visit [ Bit.ly Link ]
#PowerOfMemory
Freddy Johnson, an African American jazz pianist, was born on March 12, 1904. In 1930, he moved to Cannes, France, with his wife Ida and daughters Jacqueline and Marilyn to escape American racism and so he could pursue professional opportunities. From there they moved to Paris and The Hague. Soon after the United States entered World War II, Freddy was arrested and sent to the camp Amersfoort....
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On this day in 1942, FDR signed Executive Order 9066, authorizing the exclusion and incarceration of Japanese-Americans. Over the next six months, 120,000 men, women, and children were moved to assembly centers, then to camps; nearly 70,000 of the evacuees were American citizens. The government made no charges against them, nor could they appeal their incarceration. All lost personal...
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Join us and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the Museum on March 28 at 7 PM EDT as the Museum directors discuss the power of memory as well as the impact and the design of the Museum’s living memorials.

For more information on this event, visit [ Bit.ly Link ]
#PowerOfMemory
Each year Museum visitors hear eyewitness accounts from Holocaust survivors during our First Person series. This program allows our audience to hear survivors tell their life stories in their own words, uniting personal experience with history in a way that is extraordinary in its power.

Have you been to a First Person program? Create a post with the hashtag #USHMM for a chance to be featured...
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Today is Presidents' Day. The Museum is open but its archives, library, and offices are closed. [ Bit.ly Link ]
Monday, February 20, is Presidents' Day. The Museum will be open but its archives, libraries, and offices will be closed. [ Bit.ly Link ]
The Nazis were virulent racists who viewed history as a biologically driven struggle for survival and dominance between various peoples. They identified black people as an inferior, alien race that threatened the future existence of Western society. But that didn’t stop them from trying to exploit racial tensions among US forces to encourage desertion in the closing days of World War II....
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Children of liberator Donald Hall donated a handmade American flag to the Museum. The flag was given to their father by former prisoners in gratitude after the liberation of the Langenstein concentration camp, a sub-camp of Buchenwald. #SafeguardTheTruth #USHMM
NYC - Join us on March 28 at 7 PM EDT as we meet a Holocaust survivor and an eyewitness to the Syrian crisis who will share their personal experiences of persecution and displacement. Their accounts prompt us to consider our obligation to those threatened by mass atrocities today.

For more information on this event, visit [ Bit.ly Link ]
#NYNextGen
“While watching a TV interview, the speaker pleaded to younger generations, not about guilt, but asking us, me, to take responsibility. I would soon visit the Auschwitz Memorial and for the first time got an idea of the dimensions of suffering and atrocities committed. Shortly after, I bought my first digital camera. It was time to do my part.”
—Luigi Toscano

Italian photographer Luigi...
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"We must never become bitter or hostile.
Try to see the good in everyone.
We must choose love, not hate.
As Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once said, ‘Hate is too heavy of a burden to bear.’
It’s my hope that everyone visits the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum so we can all learn to be a little kinder to each other.”
— Representative John Lewis

Yesterday, the Museum welcomed our 2016...
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The fate of black people from 1933 to 1945 in Nazi Germany and in German-occupied territories ranged from isolation to persecution, sterilization, medical experimentation, incarceration, brutality, and murder. However, there was no systematic program for their elimination as there was for Jews and other groups. Learn more: [ Ushmm.org Link ] #BlackHistoryMonth

Photo: Propaganda slide...
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Recently, Museum donors and their families came out to visit the Museum and to learn more about the Holocaust during our annual Family Day.
Our Survivors and Victims Resource Center regularly helps Holocaust survivors and their families find records in our collections that document their experiences during and after the Holocaust. One such man is Richard Makowski of Ohio. Richard's father, Benedict Makowski, was born to Polish Catholic immigrants in the United States. During the 1920s, his parents returned to Poland, taking three...
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Our citizen history project History Unfolded: US Newspapers and the Holocaust just reached a major milestone: we’ve approved our 5,000th historical newspaper article submitted by a community member! We’d like to thank the 1,000 people who have sent us newspaper articles from around the country so far. Join the effort to research and share what your hometown knew about the Holocaust as it was...
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During the Holocaust, many professionals went along with Nazi policy enabling Hitler’s regime to carry out directives targeting Jews and others. Through the lens of this history, we’ve created programs for military personnel and other professionals who serve to protect our constitutional liberties that challenge today’s leaders to examine their roles and responsibilities in serving national...
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Join us at the Museum or via livestream tomorrow, February 9, for a discussion with several young writers, including descendants of Holocaust survivors, who grapple with trauma and loss in their cultures' and families' past. One of the writers who will take part, Suzanne Reisman, has written historical fiction based on grandfather's life before and during the Holocaust. To attend this program...
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In February 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution rejected Howard University’s request for famed African-American concert singer Marian Anderson to perform at Constitution Hall. Several civil rights groups spoke out against this egregious act of prejudice, and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution in response. In April, Anderson would give...
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