Happy Save the Frogs Day! Refuges conserve wetlands vital to frogs. This is a well-camouflaged northern leopard frog at Iowa’s Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge ([ Bit.ly Link ], about 60 miles southwest of the Quad Cities. Photo by Jessica Bolser/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Happy Save the Frogs Day Refuges conserve wetlands vital to frogs This
If there is a more beautiful songbird than the painted bunting, we’re not sure what it is. (If you can think of one, let us know.) This male was perching at Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge -- [ Bit.ly Link ] -- just northwest of Austin, Texas. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo
If there is a more beautiful songbird than the painted bunting were
Linda Beiler
Helene C. John
Cathy Wilson
“Ah, a goose down comforter!”
Thanks, Bill Carter, for this week’s winning caption. It was fun, folks. Thanks to all. Spring is a great time to visit Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge ([ Bit.ly Link ] in Oregon’s Willamette Valley.
Ah a goose down comforter Thanks Bill Carter for this weeks winning
Howard Hart
Hazel Holby
Kathleen Anne
What's in a name? Green sea turtles, shown here resting at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge ([ Bit.ly Link ], are unique among sea turtles in that, as adults, they eat only plants. They are herbivorous, feeding primarily on seagrasses and algae. This diet is thought to give them greenish-colored fat, from which they take their name. Photo by Megan Nagel/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Whats in a name Green sea turtles shown here resting at Midway
Howard Hart
At least nine national wildlife refuges are situated roughly along the Trail of Tears. In the 1830s, the U.S. government forced tens of thousands of Native Americans to move along that route from their ancestral homes in the Southeast to present-day Oklahoma. Many died along the way. The refuge terrain along the trail today embodies the natural landscape they encountered. We honor the...
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At least nine national wildlife refuges are situated roughly along the Trail
Elizabeth Abrams
Peg Rooney
An osprey takes off at Virginia’s Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge ([ Bit.ly Link ]. Osprey breeding pairs can be observed in nests throughout the refuge in spring. The nearby Potomac River provides ample food for this bird of prey, which feeds exclusively on fish. Around late summer, the ospreys migrate south to the rivers, lakes and coasts of Central and South America. U.S. Fish and...
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An osprey takes off at Virginias Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge Osprey
Alan Banks
Shannon Kelley
Can’t get to Alaska? Enjoy this gorgeous 2-minute video visit to Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge.
Hazel Holby
Cindy Garfield Kindle
Jeff Hudson
CAPTION CALL! What can we say about this Canada goose and gosling at Oregon’s Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge ([ Bit.ly Link ] Jot your captions below. We’ll pick a winner Thursday. Photo by Jim Leonard
CAPTION CALL What can we say about this Canada goose and gosling
Catherine Atchley
Christina Paugh-Greenwood
Ken Buchholz
Happy National Volunteer Week! Last year, more than 40,000 people volunteered 1.3 million hours of work for the National Wildlife Refuge System. We are grateful to each and every one of them, including the volunteer below who used a rough-skinned newt to enthrall young Puddle Stompers at Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Happy National Volunteer Week Last year more than 40000 people volunteered 13
USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System
USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System
Deena Heg
A bobcat takes five at California’s Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge ([ Bit.ly Link ]. It’s going to be really hot there soon. Because of its southern latitude, elevation of 227 feet below sea level and location in the Sonoran Desert, temperatures from May to October regularly exceed 100 degrees, with highs of 116 to 120 recorded yearly. Photo by Mark Stewart / U.S. Fish and...
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A bobcat takes five at Californias Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife
USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System
Laurel Banke
Sandra Clary
For the past two weeks, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service crews have been fighting a 28,000-acre wildfire sparked by lightning at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia ([ Bit.ly Link ]. The refuge’s Wilderness Canoe Trail overnight stops are closed for safety. The swamp’ flammable peat soil makes it vulnerable to large wildfires. Update: [ Inciweb.nwcg.gov Link ] (Photo: Valdosta...
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For the past two weeks US Fish and Wildlife Service crews have
Jean Partin
Viochita Fea
Samuel Ray
Happy Earth Day! #MakeADifference for Earth Day or any day. Join refuge Friends and help the earth and your community. Story: [ Bit.ly Link ] (USFWS)
Happy Earth Day MakeADifference for Earth Day or any day Join refuge
Bryan Harrell
You’re right! They’re all old, but horseshoe crabs are oldest living animal species. They lived before dinosaurs roamed the earth. Fossils of the helmet-shelled creatures have been found in rock that’s 445 million years old. Every spring, hordes of them come ashore to spawn at Prime Hook Wildlife Refuge and other Delaware Bay refuges. (Photo: Gregory Breese/USFWS
Youre right Theyre all old but horseshoe crabs are oldest living animal
USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System
Viochita Fea
Viochita Fea
Today’s quizzler. What’s the oldest living animal species? No cheating! (Photos: J.N. Stuart, Creative Commons, at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, NM: Gregory Breese/USFWS; Stacy Shelton)
Todays quizzler Whats the oldest living animal species No cheating Photos JN
Terry Gavin
Nancy Marie Bass
Scott Carr
Those weren’t any old bones that a hunter spotted seven years ago at Charles M Russell Refuge ([ Fws.gov Link ] in Montana. They are the fossilized remains of a prehistoric marine reptile known as a plesiosaur. Scientists published their findings last week in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology [ Bit.ly Link ] (Photo: Erin Clark/USFWS)
Those werent any old bones that a hunter spotted seven years ago
USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System
Marilyn Root
It may not be the “super bloom” in the California desert. But this spring’s wildflower display at San Diego National Wildlife Refuge is still an eye popper. “We are seeing beautiful blooms that we haven't seen in a while due to drought,” says public information specialist Lisa Cox. See her photos [ Bit.ly Link ] (Lisa Cox/USFWS)
It may not be the super bloom in the California desert But
USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System
Calico Patty
Sue Hodapp
Early onion, San Diego National Wildlife Refuge. Photo: Lisa Cox/USFWS
Flickr set: [ Bit.ly Link ]
Early onion San Diego National Wildlife Refuge Photo: Lisa CoxUSFWS
“Liberal!... Conservative!” Congrats to Katherine Joline for your winning caption.
Runner up: “ Barn !...Porch !....Barn !....Porch !” Congrats to Jayne Southall Smith
Thanks, all, for the wonderful entries. Your captions are such fun to read. (Photo: USFWS)
“Liberal Conservative” Congrats to Katherine Joline for your winning caption
Jayne Southall Smith
Lois Blevins Lindsay
Marti-Bob Schmall
CAPTION CALL! These tree swallows at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum ([ Fws.gov Link ] in Philadelphia deserve a caption. Got one? We’ll announce a winner tomorrow. (Photo: USFWS)
CAPTION CALL These tree swallows at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at
Jason J Kesler
Valerie Smith
Amanda Wilkinson
You're too good! The American pronghorn wins, reaching speeds of up to 60 mph. Pronghorn have stamina, too. They can run more than two miles nonstop at 35 mph. Find pronghorn at Hart Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon [ Fws.gov Link ]

As to the California mite's claim as fastest … sorry, that’s relative to size. [ Bit.ly Link ]
Youre too good The American pronghorn wins reaching speeds of up to
Jason J Kesler
Katherine Teel
Melissa Morgan