No longer mourn for me when I am dead
Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell
Give warning to the world that I am fled
From this vile world with vilest worms to dwell;
Nay, if you read this line, remember not
The hand that writ it; for I love you so,
That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot,
If thinking on me then should make you woe.
O, if (I say) you look upon this verse,
When I...
View details ⇨
No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall
May Hussam
Daniyal Moradpour
Joanie Schwarz Culbertson
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
yesterday at 22:38. Facebook
Today is the 401st anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare.
Today is the 401st anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare
Malaki Richard
Cynthia AD Shadish
Joan Ann Fleetwood
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
yesterday at 17:28. Facebook
Today is the 453rd anniversary of William Shakespeare's birth.
Today is the 453rd anniversary of William Shakespeare's birth
Tim Kobernat
Richard Keorkunian-Rivers
Laurin Suiter
"Sonnet 8" by William Shakespeare

Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?
Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy:
Why lov'st thou that which thou receiv'st not gladly,
Or else receiv'st with pleasure thine annoy?
If the true concord of well-tuned sounds,
By unions married, do offend thine ear,
They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the parts that thou...
View details ⇨
Sonnet 8 by William Shakespeare Music to hear why hearst thou music
Poonam Bind
Reham Zahran
Athulisiwe Dafu
Tale of Charles Dickens' fight to save William Shakespeare house retold in exhibition...
Tale of Charles Dickens' fight to save William Shakespeare house retold in exhibition

Tale of Dickens' fight to save Shakespeare house retold in exhibition

theguardian.com
Wendy Cook Beutel
Arlene Bernstein
Teresa Ledford
"Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none.
So all hail, Macbeth and Banquo!"
--Third Witch from "Macbeth" (Act 1, Scene 3)
"Thou shalt get kings though thou be none
William Shakespeare
Ian Cumming
John Albanese
William Shakespeare is widely regarded to be the most celebrated English playwright in the world, with his works being translated into 80 languages, including
William Shakespeare 03/25/2017

Why William Shakespeare’s Head May Have Been Stolen

inquisitr.com
Sergio J. Rodriguez
Emily Natsios
Mark John Rocha
"Juliet is the youngest leading female character in a Shakespeare play – she is just about to turn 14. A young girl barely into puberty, and yet one who, in the course of the play, takes life-changing decisions and tells the audience about them, in poetry of extraordinary eloquence. What was Shakespeare up to in presenting such a paradoxical figure?"

#HappyShakespeareWeek

via The British Library
Juliet is the youngest leading female character in a Shakespeare play she

Juliet's eloquence

bl.uk
J Christopher Moore
Kate Nerone
Caroline Harrison Neé Weight
"Et tu, Brute?"
-- Julius Caesar from "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar"
Et tu Brute
 Julius Caesar from The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
Marco Llano Chazen
Ekpenyong Samuel
Tom Selby
“Better three hours too soon than a minute too late.”
--from "The Merry Wives of Windsor"
“Better three hours too soon than a minute too late”

Touch A Hundred Flowers: 11 Quotes To Help You Spring Forward

signature-reads.com
Jéssica Ribeiro
Udeme Anti-forlorn Nta
Norma Reynolds
David Cicotello
Aloney Mohsina
Jeffreymark Snyder
"Take a look at The Merry Wives of Windsor, written by William Shakespeare in the 1590s. The Bard has Mistress Page exclaiming: 'I cannot tell what the dickens his name is...'. In other words, the phrase was in use more than 200 years before Charles Dickens was born. It seems to predate Shakespeare too."
Take a look at The Merry Wives of Windsor written by William

Where Does The Phrase 'What The Dickens' Come From?

londonist.com
Steve Thornton
Rufus G Threepwood
Valerie Maxwell
From Antonio spitting on Shylock's 'Jewish gabardine' to the moneylender's famous speech, 'If you prick us, do we not bleed?': Dr Aviva Dautch responds to depictions of Judaism in The Merchant of Venice.

via The British Library
From Antonio spitting on Shylocks Jewish gabardine to the moneylenders famous speech

A Jewish reading of The Merchant of Venice

bl.uk
Emma Williams
Alejandro Acuña Y Amada Martínez
Cinara Paulo Silva
Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour Sings Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18. via Open Culture
Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour Sings Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 via Open Culture

Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour Sings Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18

openculture.com
Paul Farnsworth
William Hughes
Jennifer Uchenna Orji
"Woe to that land that's governed by a child!"
--Third Citizen from "Richard III" (Act II, Scene III)
"Woe to that land that's governed by a child"
William Shakespeare
Kailee Bruce
Andrew Piper
Did you know?… Learn about the bard with our favourite William Shakespeare facts! “Some are born great, some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust upon ’em.” Born in Stratford-upon-Avon in April 1564, William Shakespeare is arguably the best known English-language playwright of all time.…
William Shakespeare 02/18/2017

10 William Shakespeare Facts We Bet You Didn’t Know - London Pass Blog

blog.londonpass.com
Ken Fletcher
Cheryl Brennan
Cin Machinack Carrasco
“The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.”
--from "The Merchant of Venice" (1605) by William Shakespeare

via Signature
“The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose”

Vigilance in an Age of 'Alternative Facts': 14 Quotes on the Art of Deceit

signature-reads.com
Florizel Amaladoss
Victor Christianopoulos
Manja Bante
"Richard II" first played at the Globe Theatre 416 years ago on this day in 1601.
"Richard II" first played at the Globe Theatre 416 years ago on this day in 1601
John Albanese
Brian Kirby
Nazzarena Labò
Ian McKellen Reads a Passionate Speech by William Shakespeare, Written in Defense of Immigrants. via Open Culture
Ian McKellen Reads a Passionate Speech by William Shakespeare Written in Defense

Ian McKellen Reads a Passionate Speech by William Shakespeare, Written in Defense of Immigrants

openculture.com
Scott Stephanie Long
Anastasia Zoldak
Stiven Pereira
In his portrayal of Prospero's 'art', Shakespeare draws parallels between theatre and magic.

via The British Library
In his portrayal of Prosperos art Shakespeare draws parallels between theatre and

Prospero: magician and artist

bl.uk
Nada Stojanovic
Ahmed Abdel Fattah
Karolina Edina Varga Kovácsné