William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
05/17/2017 at 18:24. Facebook
6 Life Lessons from William Shakespeare and Marcus Aurelius: One was an English poet and playwright, the other was a Roman Emperor and philosopher. Born a millennium apart, they have more in common than you might think…

via Obtain Eudaimonia
6 Life Lessons from William Shakespeare and Marcus Aurelius One was an

6 Life Lessons from Shakespeare & Marcus Aurelius

One was an English poet and playwright, the other was a Roman Emperor and philosopher. Born a millennium apart, they have more in common than you might think...

YOUTUBE.COM
Gregory Gliedman
Arun Kumar Sinha
Sabrina Altieri
"Because women are such potent ingredients of men's imaginations, we see how much power men feel women have over them, and how women must be suppressed, defanged, or idealized in one way or another."
-- from WOMEN OF WILL by Tina Packer
Because women are such potent ingredients of mens imaginations we see how
Sam Victors
Tony Wille
Greg Cross
On this day in 1594, William Shakespeare's "The Taming of the Shrew" was entered in the Stationers' Register.

Much of the main plot seems to come from a 1550 popular ballad called "Here Begynneth a Merry Jest of a Shrewde and Curste Wyfe, Lapped in Morrelles Skin, for her Good Behaviour." By the endeth, this contribution to the shrew-taming canon was merry from only one perspective.......
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On this day in 1594 William Shakespeares The Taming of the Shrew
Arthur Schofield
Ingrid Heyn
Kitty May Allen
In the 1790s, a teenager fooled London into thinking he was Shakespeare.
William Shakespeare 04/30/2017

The Shakespeare Fraud That Tricked Late 18th Century London

mentalfloss.com
Kristen Danielle Carrier
Edward Himse
Japhet-Raphael Riedl
Life lessons from William Shakespeare and Marcus Aurelius
Life lessons from William Shakespeare and Marcus Aurelius

Life lessons from Shakespeare and Marcus Aurelius | OUPblog

blog.oup.com
John Albanese
Steve Kerensky
Benjamin Levin
‘The Theatre no doubt stank on warm days. Standing room cost a penny, gallery space two pennies, and 'quiet standing' three. As open-air performances, the penny-audiences were at the mercy of the elements; rain, sleet, or sunshine beat down with equal fervor on the bare necks of those standing in the yard, unshielded by any sort of roof’

Professor Eric Rasmussen and Ian DeJong explore...
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The Theatre no doubt stank on warm days Standing room cost a

Shakespeare's playhouses

bl.uk
Anol Nath Chatterji
John Albanese
Reda K Ford
"No, sure, my lord, my mother cried; but then there was a star danced, and under that was I born."
--Beatrice from "Much Ado about Nothing" (Act II. Scene I)
No sure my lord my mother cried but then there was a
Malaki Richard
Ruchira Wickramasooriya
Melissa Taylor Bahrs
No longer mourn for me when I am dead
Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell
Give warning to the world that I am fled
From this vile world with vilest worms to dwell;
Nay, if you read this line, remember not
The hand that writ it; for I love you so,
That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot,
If thinking on me then should make you woe.
O, if (I say) you look upon this verse,
When I...
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No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall
Theresa Lav
Bianca Alexandra
Катя Димитрова
Today is the 401st anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare.
Today is the 401st anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare
Malaki Richard
Gordana Jaksic
Cynthia AD Shadish
Today is the 453rd anniversary of William Shakespeare's birth.
Today is the 453rd anniversary of William Shakespeare's birth
Tim Kobernat
Richard Keorkunian-Rivers
Arunansu Bikas Das
"Sonnet 8" by William Shakespeare

Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?
Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy:
Why lov'st thou that which thou receiv'st not gladly,
Or else receiv'st with pleasure thine annoy?
If the true concord of well-tuned sounds,
By unions married, do offend thine ear,
They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the parts that thou...
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Sonnet 8 by William Shakespeare Music to hear why hearst thou music
Poonam Bind
Reham Zahran
Athulisiwe Dafu
Tale of Charles Dickens' fight to save William Shakespeare house retold in exhibition...
Tale of Charles Dickens' fight to save William Shakespeare house retold in exhibition

Tale of Dickens' fight to save Shakespeare house retold in exhibition

theguardian.com
Wendy Cook Beutel
Arlene Bernstein
Teresa Ledford
"Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none.
So all hail, Macbeth and Banquo!"
--Third Witch from "Macbeth" (Act 1, Scene 3)
"Thou shalt get kings though thou be none
William Shakespeare
Ian Cumming
John Albanese
William Shakespeare is widely regarded to be the most celebrated English playwright in the world, with his works being translated into 80 languages, including
William Shakespeare 03/25/2017

Why William Shakespeare’s Head May Have Been Stolen

inquisitr.com
Rita Martelini
Sergio J. Rodriguez
Emily Natsios
"Juliet is the youngest leading female character in a Shakespeare play – she is just about to turn 14. A young girl barely into puberty, and yet one who, in the course of the play, takes life-changing decisions and tells the audience about them, in poetry of extraordinary eloquence. What was Shakespeare up to in presenting such a paradoxical figure?"

#HappyShakespeareWeek

via The British Library
Juliet is the youngest leading female character in a Shakespeare play she

Juliet's eloquence

bl.uk
J Christopher Moore
Kate Nerone
Caroline Harrison Neé Weight
"Et tu, Brute?"
-- Julius Caesar from "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar"
Et tu Brute
 Julius Caesar from The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
Marco Llano Chazen
Ekpenyong Samuel
Tom Selby
“Better three hours too soon than a minute too late.”
--from "The Merry Wives of Windsor"
“Better three hours too soon than a minute too late”

Touch A Hundred Flowers: 11 Quotes To Help You Spring Forward

signature-reads.com
Jéssica Ribeiro
Udeme Anti-forlorn Nta
Norma Reynolds
David Cicotello
Aloney Mohsina
Jeffreymark Snyder
"Take a look at The Merry Wives of Windsor, written by William Shakespeare in the 1590s. The Bard has Mistress Page exclaiming: 'I cannot tell what the dickens his name is...'. In other words, the phrase was in use more than 200 years before Charles Dickens was born. It seems to predate Shakespeare too."
Take a look at The Merry Wives of Windsor written by William

Where Does The Phrase 'What The Dickens' Come From?

londonist.com
Steve Thornton
Rufus G Threepwood
Valerie Maxwell
From Antonio spitting on Shylock's 'Jewish gabardine' to the moneylender's famous speech, 'If you prick us, do we not bleed?': Dr Aviva Dautch responds to depictions of Judaism in The Merchant of Venice.

via The British Library
From Antonio spitting on Shylocks Jewish gabardine to the moneylenders famous speech

A Jewish reading of The Merchant of Venice

bl.uk
Emma Williams
Alejandro Acuña Y Amada Martínez
Cinara Paulo Silva