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WWF-Canada
01/11/2017 at 16:35. Facebook
David Miller talks about his resolution to tackle Toronto's tallest challenge as part of WWF-Canada's CN Tower Climb for Nature. On April 8, he'll climb all 1,776 steps – for his health and the health of the planet. You can, too. Register at wwf.ca/cntower.

David Miller sets out to climb the CN Tower!

bttoronto.ca
WWF-Canada
01/10/2017 at 19:00. Facebook
Make 2017 great with these 17 green resolutions that make the world a better place for wildlife.

17 resolutions for a greener 2017 | WWF-Canada Blog

blog.wwf.ca
Unlike most other owl species, snowy owls hunt mainly in the daytime.
The oldest member of the endangered southern resident orca population has died, bringing the total number remaining to only 78.

The cause of death is unknown, but she was estimated to be 105 years old. These endangered orcas face several risks that we’ve been working to mitigate. Learn more about our work in the Salish Sea: [ Wwf.ca Link ]

Oldest southern resident orca 'Granny' has died, whale researchers say

vancouverisland.ctvnews.ca
The Arctic fox has thick fur on its paws for insulation and to make it easier to walk on snow and ice.
WWF-Canada Water Ambassadors The Water Brothers stopped by to deliver a gift for the new year: A $5,000 donation from SK Films after they won the Nature Inspiration Award for Best Canadian Business from the Canadian Museum of Nature.

To learn more about about SK Films nature and IMAX cinema work visit: [ Skfilms.ca Link ]
To catch up with the latest episodes of The Water Brothers TV series...
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Incorporating the Inuit voice into the study of climate change isn't optional; it is essential, scientists believe.

'It's their backyard': Inuit voice essential in Arctic climate studies, scientists say

cbc.ca
2017 is going be a game-changer for the planet (in a good way).

17 reasons 2017 is going to be a great year for the planet (really!)

blog.wwf.ca
In 2016, the giant panda was downgraded from ‘Endangered’ to ‘Vulnerable’ on the global list of species at risk of extinction, demonstrating how an integrated approach can help save our planet’s vanishing biodiversity. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) announced the positive change to the giant panda’s official status in the Red List of Threatened Species, pointing to...
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...and we're thankful for each and every one of you! See the impact your support is having on nature: [ Wwf.ca Link ] #2016rewind
In 2016, we made conservation history.

The past year has shown that when we work together, we can have a huge impact on wildlife, people and the planet. Discover more in our 2016 Annual Report: [ Wwf.ca Link ]
After a century of constant decline, 2016 was a year that saw the number of wild tigers on the rise for the first time. Around 3,890 tigers now exist in the wild, according to data released in April. That’s up from an estimated 3,200 reported in 2010. WWF works with governments, law enforcement, and local communities to advocate zero tolerance for tiger poaching across Asia, and uses the...
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Thousands of fish are washing up on shore. The cause is unknown at this time.

Dead fish, crabs and lobsters: Nova Scotia marine mystery growing

ctvnews.ca
It was a moment to celebrate on World Oceans Day 2016 when Shell Canada relinquished 30 oil and gas exploration permits that were the subject of a lawsuit launched by WWF-Canada. [ Wwf.ca Link ] #2016rewind
A rainbow-headed snake, a dragon-like lizard and a newt that looks like a Klingon from Star Trek are just three of the 163 new species discovered in the Greater Mekong region last year.

Species Oddity: New Species Discovery

wwf.panda.org
In 2016, after assessing 19 of the country's 25 major watersheds, we’ve found that there’s a pronounced lack of available and accessible data on the health of the watersheds. That's why WWF-Canada is working to increase monitoring in the watersheds where the need is greatest. #2016rewind

WWF-Canada Annual Report 2016

wwf.ca
The walrus uses its long tusks to make breathing holes in thick sea ice.
2016 was a big year for Atlantic cod. In March, southern Newfoundland 3Ps cod became the first Canadian Atlantic cod fishery to achieve MSC certification as sustainable and well managed. The fishery currently provides MSC-certified cod to markets in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. #2016rewind

Sustainability milestone for Newfoundland cod

annualreport2016.wwf.ca
After forest fires destroyed woodpeckers’ natural habitat in the 1960s, they began to make their homes in telephone poles. But after decades of ice, wind and gutting, the city of Lumsden’s telecommunications were at risk of collapsing. With a WWF-Canada Go Wild Community Grant presented by TELUS, and help from elementary school students, community activist Bill Bryden was able to build new...
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Nesting woodpeckers take toll on poles, Lumsden man fights back

cbc.ca
A new species of bird that lived 90 million years ago has been identified in the Canadian Arctic.

New prehistoric bird species discovered in Arctic

cbc.ca