Sunny day in Mammoth today. Sightings along the Beaver Ponds Trail were bison, elk, a skunk, bluebirds, flickers, killdeer, juncos, chickadees, and WILDFLOWERS! The signs of spring are starting to show.
While bears and marmots are fast asleep during the winter, martens (and other members of the weasel family) are busy hunting every day for enough calories to stay warm. Seeing one is a rare treat. Getting one to stay still long enough to take a photo, that's a different story!
Love the stunning colors of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. Reminds us of peering into the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.
The sunset is getting close to 8pm these days. Anyone else besides us enjoying the extra daylight?
A lot has been written and reported about bison management over the years, but rarely have we seen the issue addressed with such depth. The 7-episode Threshold podcast series dives into the complexities of maintaining a wild, migratory population of bison in the 21st century and features the perspectives of people--from all sides--who care passionately about this issue. Start with episode one...
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Episode 1

thresholdpodcast.org
Members of the Canyon Pack stare through the trees in a brief encounter near Norris Junction last week.
If you have taken a walk through Biscuit Basin, you have seen Wall Pool which has an interesting and explosive past. It, along with nearby Black Opal Pool and Black Diamond Pool, were created by hydrothermal explosions in the early 1900s. The pools were intermittently active as geysers until 1953 when they quieted down. Then in 2005 & 6 the pools once again became energized and erupted...
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Happy spring equinox! The north entrance of the park is starting to green while the south entrance still has over 4' of snow on the ground. Are you starting to see signs of spring where you live?
The suppression of lake trout via netting has been ongoing in Yellowstone Lake since 1994 when this non-native species was first discovered. Twenty-two years later, we continue to catch large numbers of lake trout. So, why should lake trout suppression be maintained, what’s the science behind it, and what’s the prognosis for the future? Read more in our latest issue of Yellowstone Science at [...
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Comments sought on proposed temporary parking area at Midway Geyser Basin: [ Go.nps.gov Link ].
The mystery of cougar M198: Episode 3 of our #TelemetryPodcast. [ Go.nps.gov Link ] (photo courtesy of Drew Rush).
Brenna Cassidy is a biological technician who has contributed to Yellowstone's wildlife research for five years. Her B.S. is in Wildlife Ecology from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. Shown here surveying for peregrine falcons along the cliffs of the Yellowstone River in the remote Thorofare area, Brenna has worked for the Yellowstone Bird Program, has spent one winter working for the...
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Don't let the warm temps in the north part of the park fool you. There is still plenty of snow in the interior. Here is a short clip of the snow crew hard at work near Obsidian Cliff from last week.
The bears are back in town! [ Go.nps.gov Link ]
This week in 1894, scout Felix Burgess captured notorious poacher Ed Howell skinning bison hides inside Yellowstone. Stories about Howell’s arrest were picked up by the national press. The public outcry that followed led to the Lacey Act of 1894, which formally protected the wildlife in Yellowstone from hunting. Today a healthy population of bison live in the park: the largest on public land...
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Planning a visit this summer? Why not also schedule a visit to our neighbors to the south, Fossil Butte National Monument?

One of the premier fossil sites in the world, Fossil Butte is known for exceptional preservation and diversity of fossilized fishes, insects, plants, reptiles, birds, and mammals like this horse pictured here.

Learn more at: [ Nps.gov Link ]
Often a brown blur in a dense forest, this marten took its time exploring a stump (or John Burman was quick with his camera).
The sights and sounds of Jewel Geyser. Located in Biscuit Basin, this geyser erupts on a consistent interval of less than 10 minutes.
Some recent views from Old Faithful, courtesy Ranger Bach.